Bulletin_13-14

 

University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center

Graduate College Bulletin

2014-2015

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1000 North Stanton L. Young Boulevard

Oklahoma City, Oklahoma† 73117

Bird Library, Room 258

405-271-2085

http://ouhsc.edu/graduate

 

1.1 ADMINISTRATORS

Oklahoma Regents for Higher Education

Glen D. Johnson, Chancellor and Vice Chair

Michael C. Turpen, Chairman

General Toney Stricklin, Secretary

Ronald H. White, M.D., Assistant Secretary

Marlin ďIkeĒ Glass, Jr.


James D. ďJimmyĒ Harrel

Joseph L. Parker, Jr.


John Massey


Jay Helm


Ann Holloway

University of Oklahoma Board of Regents

Tom Clark., Chairman

Jon R. Stuart, Vice-Chairman

A. Max Weitzenhoffer

Clayton I. Bennett

Kirk D. Humphries

Leslie J. Rainbolt-Forbes, M.D.

Bill W. Burgess, Jr.,

Chris A. Purcell, Ph.D., Vice President for University Governance

 

University of Oklahoma Executive Officers

David L. Boren, President

Kyle Harper, Interim Senior Vice President and Provost, Norman campus

M. Dewayne Andrews, M.D., MACP, Senior Vice President and Provost, Health Sciences Center and Executive Dean, College of Medicine

Gerard P. Clancy, M.D., President, OU-Tulsa

Anil Gollahalli, J.D., Vice President of the University of Oklahoma and General Counsel to the Board of Regents of the University of Oklahoma governing the University of Oklahoma, Cameron University and Rogers State University

Chris A. Purcell, Ph.D., Executive Secretary of the University of Oklahoma Board of Regents; Vice President for University Governance; and Secretary of the University of Oklahoma, Cameron University and Rogers State University

Nicholas S. Hathaway, Executive Vice President and Vice President of Administration and Finance, Norman Campus, and Vice President for Strategic Planning

Kenneth D. Rowe, Vice President for Administration and Finance, Health Sciences Center

Matthew W. Hamilton, Vice President for Enrollment and Student Financial Services and Registrar

Loretta M. Early, Vice President for Information Technology and Chief Information Officer

Joseph R. Castiglione Sr., Vice President for Intercollegiate Athletics Programs and Director of Athletics

Catherine F. Bishop, Vice President for Public Affairs

Kelvin K. Droegemeier, Ph.D., Vice President for Research, Norman Campus

James J. Tomasek, Ph.D., Vice President for Research, Health Sciences Center

Christopher Howard, Vice President for Strategic and Leadership Initiatives

Clarke Stroud, Vice President for Student Affairs

Tripp Hall, Vice President for University Development

James P. Pappas, Ph.D., Vice President for University Outreach and Dean, College of Liberal Studies

Berrien Moore, III, Ph.D., Vice President for Weather and Climate Programs and Dean, College of Atmospheric and Geographic Sciences

Daniel W. Pullin, Vice President and Dean, Michael F. Price College of Business

Bobby Mason, M.B.A., University Equal Opportunity Officer

Laura M. Palk, J.D., University Institutional Equity and Title IX Coordinator, and Assistant General Counsel

Joseph Harroz Jr., University Vice President and Dean, College of Law

Danny Hilliard, University Vice President for External Relations and Planning

Guy L. Patton,  OU Foundation

Clive W. Mander, Director of Internal Audit and Chief Audit Executive

 

OUHSC Administrative Structure

David L. Boren, President

M. Dewayne Andrews, M.D., MACP, Senior Vice President and Provost, Health Sciences Center and Executive Dean, College of Medicine

Kenneth D. Rowe, Vice President for Administration and Finance

     Teresa M. Henson, Associate Vice President for Administration and Finance, Chief Financial Officer

     Les J. Hoven, Associate Vice President and Chief Human Resources Officer

     Burr Milsap, Associate Vice President for Purchasing and Printing Services

     Brad Avery, Assistant Vice President for Administration and Finance Controller

     James S. Albertson, Chief, Campus Police and Safety

     Kathy C. Walker, Director, Administrative Support Services

     Bart T. Mercer, Director, Budget

     Amanda F. Miller, J.D., Director, Enterprise Risk and Real Estate Management

     Bobby J. Jackson, Director, Landscape Services

     Don Cail, Director, Operations

     Doug W. Myers, Director, Parking and Transportation Services

     Kelley A. Spelman, Ph.D., Director, University Health Club

     Tony Rhone, General Manager, Faculty House

James J. Tomasek, Ph.D., Vice President for Research

     Martha K. Ogilvie, Ph.D., Assistant Vie President for Research

     Gary L. White, Ph.D., Director, Comparative Medicine

     Allison F. Gillaspy, Ph.D., Director, Core Facilities

Marcia Bennett, Ph.D., Vice Provost for Health Sciences

     Kevin A Fitzgerald, Assistant Vice Provost for Project Management

Valerie N. Williams, Ph.D., Vice Provost for Academic Affairs and Faculty Development

     Jane Pippin, Ph.D., Assistant Vice Provost for Academic Affairs

     Lori A. Klimkowski, Registrar

     Candace A. Shaw, Assistant Vice Provost for Academic Technology, Center for Telemedicine

     Joy Summers-Ables, Director, Robert M. Bird Library


Jason Sanders, M.D.,, Vice President for Planning and Administrative Affairs

Angela Z. Monson, Associate Provost for Community Partnerships and Health Policy

     Brian K. Corpening, MS, Assistant Provost for Diversity and Community Partnerships

Loretta M. Early, Vice President for Information Technology and Chief Information Officer


     Rebecca Trepagnier, Assistant Vice President for Information Technology, HSC

     David M. Horton, Associate Vice President for Shared Services and Chief Technology

     Mark E. Ferguson, Director, Application Services

     Randy W. Moore, Director, Information Security Services

     Chris J. Jones, Director, IT Service Desk

     Bryan H. Beavers, IT Department Business Administrator

Vice President for Public Affairs, Catherine F. Bishop

Clarke Stroud, Vice President for Student Affairs

     Kate Stanton, Executive Director

     Carlos L. Rodiriguez, Associate Director, HSC Student Affairs

     Stephen B. Neely, Coordinator, David L. Boren Student Union

     Victoria Christofi, Ph.D., Director, HSC Student Counseling Services

     Ali Thomas, Director, HSC Food Services

     Jim Weller, Manager, University Village

Dean, Graduate College, H. Anne Pereira, Ph.D.


Health Sciences Center Deans

H. Anne Pereira, Ph.D., Graduate College

Kevin Rudeen, Ph.D., College of Allied Health

Stephen K. Young, DDS, College of Dentistry

M. Dewayne Andrews, M.D., MACP, Executive Dean, College of Medicine and Senior Vice President and Provost, Health Sciences Center

Lazelle Benefield, Ph.D., R.N., FAAN, College of Nursing

JoLaine Reierson Draugalis, Ph.D., College of Pharmacy

Gary Raskob, Ph.D., College of Public Health

 

Norman Campus Deans

Charles W. Graham, Dean, College of Architecture

Kelly Damphousse, Ph.D., Dean, College of Arts and Sciences

Berrien Moore, III, Ph.D., College of Atmospheric and Geographic Sciences

Daniel W. Pullin, Dean (and Vice President), Michael F. Price College of Business

Larry R. Grillot, Ph.D., Dean, Mewbourne College of Earth and Energy

Gregg A. Garn, Ph.D., Dean, Jeannine Rainbolt College of Education

Thomas L. Landers, Dean, College of Engineering

Richard C. Taylor, B.F.A., Dean, Weitzenhoffer Family College of Fine Arts

T.H. Lee Williams, Ph.D., Dean, Graduate College

David H. Ray, Ph.D., Dean, Honors College

Suzette Grillot, Ph.D., Dean, College of International Studies

Joe S. Foote, Ph.D., Dean, Gaylord College of Journalism and Mass Communication

Joseph Harroz Jr., J.D., Dean, College of Law (and University Vice President)

James P. Pappas, Ph.D., Dean, College of Liberal Studies (and Vice President for University Outreach)

T. Nicole Judice-Campbell, Ph.D., Dean, University College

Rick Luce, Dean, University Libraries (and Associate Vice President for Research)

Tulsa Deans

Ondria Gleason, M.D., Interim Dean, School of Community Medicine, Tulsa

William O. Ray, Graduate College-Tulsa (Associate Vice President for Academic Affairs, Tulsa)

1.2 THE UNIVERSITY OF OKLAHOMA
In 1890, 17 years before Oklahoma became a state, the University of Oklahoma (OU) was founded in Norman. Today, OU is a major research university that serves the educational, cultural and economic needs of the state, region, and nation.

OU is a gathering place for students and scholars from across the nation and around the globe. Nationally known academic programs and internationally recognized faculty attract outstanding students. The relatively low cost of attending the university adds to OU's international appeal. OU provides scholars outstanding research facilities and unique resources, while offering a diverse community with professors from various ethnic backgrounds and opportunities for students to participate in numerous cultural organizations.

1.3 HEALTH SCIENCES CENTER
The University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center is the state's only comprehensive health center for training physicians, dentists, nurses, pharmacists, public health specialists, biomedical scientists, and allied health personnel. The campus has approximately 4,000 students enrolled in more than 60 graduate, professional, and undergraduate degree programs. Faculty and students use the clinical, laboratory and teaching facilities of the Biomedical Research Park, OU Medical Center, Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Children's Hospital, l, Dean A. McGee Eye Institute, Oklahoma State Department of Health, Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation, affiliated hospitals in Oklahoma City, the major teaching hospitals in Tulsa, the Veterans Affairs Hospital in Muskogee, and various affiliated hospitals and clinics in other locations in Oklahoma. The OU Health Sciences Center is the educational core of a group of 26 public and private health care institutions and agencies that comprise the Oklahoma Health Center.

The OU Health Sciences Center campus, located in Oklahoma City, is composed of seven colleges. They are:

ē Graduate College
ē College of Allied Health
ē College of Dentistry
ē College of Medicine
ē College of Nursing
ē College of Pharmacy
ē College of Public Health

We invite you to visit the university or contact us for further information about the wide variety of educational programs the OUHSC offers. For more information, visit the university's website at http://www.OUHSC.edu. To arrange a visit to the campus, write or call:

 

Office of Student Affairs

David L. Boren Student Union

1106 N. Stonewall Avenue Room, Suite 300
Oklahoma City, OK 73117
(405) 271-3606

 


E-mail: student-services@OUHSC.edu

1.4 OFFICE OF STUDENT AFFAIRS

OUHSC Student Affairs is dedicated to the support and enhancement of the academic mission of the university. The office provides programming and services to both current and prospective students. Programming is structured to compliment the studentís academic experience, celebrate the rich diversity of the campus, provide opportunities to develop leadership skills and participate in community service, and offer an entertaining and safe social atmosphere. Services are offered to ensure physical, emotional, and mental health of all students and provide guidance toward a career as a health care professional.

OUHSC Student Affairs assists the campus community in development of student life by overseeing the planning and implementation of effective programming to enhance the Health Sciences Center campus community such as the Writing Center, legal counseling, campus housing, and oversight of the student health insurance program.

OUHSC Student Affairs offers Counseling Services at the Health Sciences Center. Besides providing individual and couples psychotherapy, Counseling Services provides individual counseling, couple and group counseling, psychological assessment free of charge to OUHSC students. To make an appointment, call (405) 271-7336, Monday through Friday 8:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. The Counseling Services is located in the Student Union, room 300. Visit the website at:
http://students.ouhsc.edu/SCS/.

OUHSC Student Affairs offers Multicultural Student Services to minorities, non-minorities, and outside agencies to create a diverse culture of understanding, cooperation and acceptance of all cultures in their training and inclusion in OUHSC programs. The Multicultural Services Coordinator works closely with student organizations on campus in maintaining structure and harmony with each other and the administration, fulfilling that diverse atmosphere needed for future health professionals.

OUHSC Student Affairs offers Prospective Student Services to identify and recruit students interested in health science careers as well as coordinating advisement for all OUHSC programs. They assist OUHSC colleges in publicizing their programs by attending career days at all Oklahoma colleges and universities, distributing program information guides, conducting campus tours, and working with all programs and schools from grade school to post secondary schools who wish to introduce students to the pre-health majors offered at the Health Sciences Center.

1.5 OFFICE OF ADMISSIONS & RECORDS

The Office of Admissions and Records provides services to students and faculty by maintaining accurate records of the academic progress and accomplishments of its students. Students are entitled to efficient and responsive treatment in admissions, registration and transcript services.

Questions relating to admission, enrollment or record/transcript process for prospective, currently enrolled or former students may refer to the web page at http://www.ouhsc.edu/admissions/ or call 405-271-2359.

1.6 INTERNATIONAL STUDENT SERVICES

International students may seek assistance in the Office of Admissions and Records concerning documents necessary for compliance with SEVIS, the Homeland Security Student Reporting System. This system electronically processes immigration applications, i.e., admission, departure/re-entry to the United States, extension of stay, transfer to other institutions, change of visa status, application for optional practical training pre- and post-practical, letters of certification for foreign exchange, etc. Requests for services should be made as early as possible in that the system delays are likely or probable.

The Office of Admissions and Records is located in the Basic Sciences Education Building, 941 Stanton Young Boulevard, Room 200. For further information, call (405) 271-2359. International applicants must contact Personnel Services at (405) 271-2189 for processing J-1 or H-1 visas. Additional information can be found at: http://www.ouhsc.edu/admissions/International/iss.html


1.7 VETERANS SERVICES

The Office of Admissions and Records provides certification of enrollment for students at the OUHSC who receive financial assistance through the Veterans Administration. Students enrolling at the OUHSC for the first time are encouraged to stop by the office or call (405) 271-2359 at your earliest convenience to begin the necessary paperwork for notifying the Veterans Administration. Additional information can be found at: http://www.ouhsc.edu/admissions/veteranpolicy.html


1.8 OFFICE OF THE BURSAR

A financial obligation is incurred at the time a student enrolls in course work at this institution. Specific questions regarding payment of tuition and fees should be directed to the Bursar's Office in the Service Center Building, Room 114. The office is open 8:00 A.M. to 5:00 P.M. Monday through Friday, except for university recognized holidays.


1.9 OFFICE OF FINANCIAL AID

Any student accepted for enrollment at the Health Sciences Center may apply for financial assistance. For financial aid information or to obtain an application packet, contact the Office of Financial Aid, P.O. Box 26901, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73190. The Office of Financial Aid is located in the Student Union, Room 301, (405) 271-2118. Entering students should apply for financial aid as early as possible.

Additional awards, loans, scholarships, fellowships, grants, and stipends are offered through individual colleges and departments at the Health Sciences Center. Please contact the college or department of interest for additional information.


1.10 EQUAL OPPORTUNITY AND AFFIRMATIVE ACTION

The OUHSC is committed to a policy of nondiscrimination in the admission and education of students. This institution, in compliance with all applicable federal and state laws and regulations, does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, age, religion, disability, or status as a veteran in any of its policies, practices or procedures. This includes but is not limited to admissions, employment, financial aid, and educational services.
The Office of Equal Opportunity is located in the Service Center Building, Room 113.


1.11 STUDENT HEALTH SERVICES

Students pay a Student Health fee each semester for a variety of medical services provided through the Student Health Clinic in the Family Medicine Center (FMC). Located at 900 NE 10th St., FMC clinics see patients by appointment Monday through Friday. For appointments, call (405) 271-4311. Staff at the FMC will make every effort to accommodate students' academic schedules. Further information found at http://students.ouhsc.edu/FMC.asp.


1.12 STUDENT HEALTH INSURANCE

All OUHSC students are required to have health insurance. This may be obtained through the OUHSC student plan or a plan of their choice. The University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center provides the option to purchase a health insurance plan with a designated private insurance company. Individual, spouse, and/or family coverage may be obtained by any Health Sciences Center student. Applications for coverage may be obtained upon admission to the university. Details found at http://students.ouhsc.edu/HealthInsurance.asp.


1.13 ROBERT M. BIRD LIBRARY
The Robert M. Bird Health Sciences Library is responsible for the resource materials and services necessary to support the teaching, research, and service missions of the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center. The Library supports graduate, professional, and undergraduate study in medicine, nursing, pharmacy, dentistry, public health, and allied health. As the largest collection of medical information in the state, the library serves as a major information resource for health professionals and all citizens of Oklahoma. Details on services, the library collection and policies related to library use are available in the Library or visit the home page for the Robert M. Bird Library at: http://library.OUHSC.edu.

1.14 INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY

Information and communication solutions to enhance teaching, healing, and discovering are the challenge of Information Technology (IT) at OUHSC. IT offers a total information and communication solution, integrating networking, telecommunications, the Internet and intranet, enterprise and desktop database technology and applications. Enterprise solutions bring institutional and collegiate information from servers to the individual desktops of the faculty members, researchers, clinicians, students, staff, and administrators. For more information, visit the IT website at http://it.ouhsc.edu/.

Information Technology is committed to supporting teaching and learning through the innovation and implementation of dependable and responsive technologies and services. Working closely with the students, faculty and staff, IT provides the campus with comprehensive support solutions encompassing desktop computing, network services, telecommunications, and Internet technologies as well as the computer infrastructure and application support for University-wide services such as email, student administration, human resources, and financials.


1.15 OUHSC STUDENT UNION

The OUHSC Student Union is located at 1106 North Stonewall. The Student Union is home to OUHSC Student Affairs, Financial Aid, the OUHSC Student Association, and the IT Helpdesk. The Student Union offers banking services including an ATM, a Food Court, a sand volleyball court and basketball court. Multipurpose rooms, including the Boren Lounge, offer students a quiet and relaxing place to study or chat with friends. While the OUHSC Student Union facility is devoted to the OUHSC community, the surrounding community utilizes the facility for meetings, retreats, parties, and wedding receptions. OUHSC Students are granted 24-hour access with a valid OUHSC Student ID. Please call (405) 271-3285 for more information.

1.16 FITNESS AND RECREATIONAL SERVICES

The Health Sciences Center campus offers Fitness and Recreational Services free to students in the University Health Club located at 1000 N. Lincoln. Call (405) 271-1650 for information regarding fitness center operation times and policies regarding the center. Intramural programs, sponsored by OUHSC Student Affairs and the OUHSC Student Association offer students the opportunity to compete in a variety of competitions. For information regarding intramural sports, view the website at http://students.ouhsc.edu/IM/sports.asp. Health Sciences Center students interested in utilizing the Huston Huffman Recreational Center on the Norman campus may choose one of the following options:
1. Pay a semester facility fee at the center whereby the student's identification card will be validated to allow full access.
2. Present a valid OUHSC identification card and pay a per visit fee.
The student must present a valid OUHSC identification for either option or the fee must be paid at the Norman campus.a

1.17 HOUSING

University Village located on the Health Sciences Center campus in OKC, is available to all OUHSC students and operated by the University. University Village offers two-bedroom town homes and one-bedroom studio apartments. Residents enjoy gated parking, a game room, washer and dryers, and free Internet. Visit http://village.ou.edu/ or the University Village Manager at (405) 271-0500 for more information.

1.18 STUDENT IDENTIFICATION CARDS

All OUHSC students must have an ID card. To obtain an ID card, report to the OneCard Office in the Service Center Building, SCB 118, 1100 N. Lindsay, Oklahoma City. For more information you may contact the office at 271-2980.

1.19 STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS

Student organizations must be registered with OUHSC Student Affairs. Registration allows students use of university facilities and services for decreased costs, ability to apply for OUHSC Student Association funding, and the use of OUHSC Student Affairs web based listing of events. Approval of student organizations and activities shall be based upon such considerations as performance, educational purpose, and other criteria related to the goals and objectives of the organization, purposes of the activities and how they fit within the mission and scope of the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center. Membership in student organizations cannot be restricted by gender, race, color, religion, national origin, age disability or veteran status. Membership may be restricted by academic area, educational level (undergraduate, graduate, professional, etc.) or other academic/professional status. Please visit the OUHSC student organizatons webpage at http://students.ouhsc.edu/Orgs/ or call (405) 271-2416 for information regarding registration requirements and a complete list of registered student organizations.

1.20 †PARKING

Students are eligible to apply for parking in a designated parking lot operated by the University of Oklahoma. All students parking at the Oklahoma Health Center must have a current Health Center parking permit. Special parking may be obtained for persons with physical disabilities in accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act. Emergency telephones are located in strategic areas in the parking lot and parking personnel are available for assistance.

Current fees are found online at http://www.ouhsc.edu/parking/ . Contact the Parking Office at 271-2020 for additional information. The Parking Office is located in the Service Center Building at 1100 N. Lindsey, Suite, 100, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73104. The office is open Monday through Friday from 7:30 a.m. - 5:30 p.m.

1.21 ATHLETIC TICKETS

Each spring OUHSC Student Affairs coordinates with the OU Athletic Ticket Office in conducting a presale of season football and basketball tickets on the Health Sciences Center campus. Tickets to "away" and OU-Texas football games must be ordered at that time. Following the presale, season tickets are encoded into student ID cards. Away game tickets are disbursed by OUHSC Student Affairs located in Suite 300, Student Union. For further information, contact OUHSC Student Affairs (271-2416), the Athletic Ticket Office (325-2424) or refer online to
http://students.ouhsc.edu/Services/.

1.22 ACADEMIC APPEALS

The responsibility for academic evaluation rests with the faculty. If a student believes he or she has been wrongfully and unfairly evaluated by an instructor, and if the student is not able to resolve the matter in conference with the instructor or the department chair, an appeal may be made to the appeals board of the college offering the course. Each college has an academic appeals board consisting of an equal number of students and faculty. Faculty members of the board are chosen by the faculty of the college for a term determined by the faculty. Student members of the board are appointed for a term of one year by the dean of the college upon recommendations from the student body president. It is the primary function of a board to mediate or adjudicate disputes that have not been satisfactorily resolved at the department level. All thesis and dissertation appeals are heard by the Graduate College Appeals Board.

A board will hear a case only after an attempt has been made by the student and the instructor to resolve their differences, if necessary, in consultation with the department chair. If in the judgment of the board the case already has been satisfactorily resolved in the department, it may refuse the student a further hearing. Each board is given the responsibility of establishing its own rules of procedure. Such rules must be consistent with the full protection of the rights of all parties involved. Meetings of a board may be closed to the public.

If a board fails to achieve a settlement mutually satisfactory to the parties involved, it will recommend a means of settling the dispute to the executive committee (or comparable body) of the college, where final disposition will be made.

Further information regarding the University Academic Appeals Policy may be found in the Student Handbook found online at:  http://www.ouhsc.edu/admissions/handbook/

1.23 ACADEMIC MISCONDUCT

The policy regarding dishonest work is detailed in the Academic Misconduct Code, which describes academic misconduct as (a) cheating (using unauthorized materials, information, or study aids in any academic exercise or on national board examination), plagiarism, falsification of records, unauthorized possession of examinations, intimidation, and any and all other actions that may improperly affect the evaluation of a student's academic performance or achievement; (b) assisting others in any such act; or (c) attempting to engage in such acts.

The code provides that the student's dean shall be notified of the charge and the dean shall notify the student. Notification of the dean shall be in writing with a brief description of the evidence, and shall be made within 10 University business days after discovery of the incident, exclusive of University breaks or academic inter- sessions. The code outlines possible disciplinary actions, the provisions for a conference with the Vice Provost for Educational Services, and the request for a hearing or appeal. A complete copy of the Academic Misconduct Code is available online at
http://www.admissions.ouhsc.edu/handbook/Academic_Misconduct.htm.

1.24 RESEARCH PROGRAMS

Research is a critical mission of the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center. It is vital to the growth, health and progress of the state of Oklahoma, region, and nation. In fiscal year 2007-2008 approximately 681 grants and contracts were awarded totaling in excess of $141 million. Participation in research and creative activity projects is fundamental to a graduate studentís training and development. Various projects that support graduate students are conducted in all graduate programs offered at the university. Information about current research projects is available from each academic department. Graduate students are encouraged to contact the graduate liaison in their academic program for information on research projects that will match their studies and for opportunities to join these research teams.

For more information on these programs and others that may be available, please contact:
Graduate College:

Robert M. Bird Library
PO Box 26901
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73126-0901
http://graduate.ouhsc.edu/graduate/Graduate_Programs.html

1.25 HUMAN SUBJECTS IN RESEARCH

All research involving human subjects or the use of data generated via human subjects research, which will result in publication or presentation, must be reviewed and approved by the University of Oklahoma-Health Sciences Center Institutional Review Board (IRB) prior to subject recruitment and data collection. All human subject research to be performed by faculty, staff, or students of the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center must be reviewed by the IRB. The IRBís primary roles are to determine if the rights and welfare of human subjects who volunteer to participate in research studies are adequately protected and ensure that adequate informed consent procedures are used. The University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center policy for the protection of human subjects in research activities and IRB application materials can be accessed at the following: http://www.OUHSC.edu/irb/. If you have questions about compliance or the IRB approval process, you may contact the Office of Human Research Participant Protection at (405) 271-2045 or e-mail http://www.ouhsc.edu/irb/

1.26 USE OF VERTEBRATE ANIMALS IN RESEARCH

All research performed on live vertebrate animals or teaching that uses live vertebrates must be described for review and approval by the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC) prior to obtaining animals and data collection. The primary role of the IACUC is to assure compliance with the U.S. Animal Welfare Act and Amendments and to assure that animals receive humane care during procedures in accordance with federal regulations of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) and the Office of Laboratory Animal Welfare of the Public Health Service (OLAW/PHS). If you have questions on the IACUC policies and procedures, you may contact the IACUC office at (405) 271-7381 or visit the web site at:
http://OUHSC.edu/iacuc.

1.27 PATENT POLICY

The University of Oklahoma Intellectual Property Policy governs the ownership of certain inventions made by University students, staff, and/or faculty members. The policy provides, in part, that all discoveries and/or inventions, patentable or not patentable, which are made or conceived of while the inventor is a student at the university with substantial use of university facilities not normally made available to students, or are made with funds provided by or through the university (including research funds), are the property of the University. The policy protects and offers substantial benefits to the inventor, while simultaneously protecting the University’s interests in the invention. Students and faculty members are expected to be familiar with their rights and obligations under the University Intellectual Property Policy and to promptly report any inventions as outlined in the Policy. Please be aware that the University Intellectual Property Policy is subject to revision at any time, and the most current version of the policy will be available online.  The Intellectual Property Policy is found  in the Faculty Handbook Section 4.23) at http://www.ouhsc.edu/provost/documents/FacultyHandbookOUHSC.pdf .   Students who make an invention or discovery which is covered under the stated conditions should contact the Intellectual Property Management Office at (405) 271-7725 or via e-mail at  OTD@ouhsc.edu.

1.28 DISCRIMINATION POLICY

The University has a policy of internal adjudication in matters relating to alleged discrimination. Any faculty member, staff member, or student, including those on temporary or part-time status, who believes that he or she has been discriminated against because of race, color, national origin, sex, age, religion, disability or status as a veteran should file a complaint under the Grievance Procedure for Complaints Based Upon Discrimination, Sexual Harassment, Consensual Sexual Relationships or Racial and Ethnic Harassment. Contact the Affirmative Action Office, OUHSC, Service Center Building, Room 113, (405) 271-2110 for additional information or you may visit their web site at
http://www.OUHSC.edu/eoaa/documents/DISCRIMINATION%20POLICY.pdf

1.29 REASONABLE ACCOMMODATION POLICY

The University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center will reasonably accommodate qualified individuals with a disability unless such accommodation would pose an undue hardship, would result in a fundamental alteration in the nature of the service, program or activity or in undue financial or administrative burdens. The term "reasonable accommodation" is used in its general sense in this policy to apply to employees, students, and visitors. For more information on the Reasonable Accommodation Policy, please visit http://www.ou.edu/drc/home.html

1.30 RELEASE OF STUDENT INFORMATION AND ACCESS TO STUDENT RECORDS

Information about students and former students gathered by the University of Oklahoma is of two types: (1) directory and (2) confidential. Any office gathering such information and/or having custody of it shall release it only in accordance with this policy. When a student enters a university and furnishes data required for academic and personal records, there is an implicit and justifiable assumption of trust placed in the university as custodian of such information. This relationship continues with regard to any data subsequently generated during the student's enrollment.

While the University fully acknowledges the student's rights of privacy concerning this information, it also recognizes that certain information is part of the public record and may be released for legitimate purposes. The following policies adopted by the University can be found at the Office of Admissions and Records Website: Directory Information, Disclosure of Education Records, Record of Requests for Disclosure, Procedures to Inspect Education Records, Correction of Education Records, Limitations on Right of Access, Refusal to Provide Copies, Fees for Copies of Records, and the Oklahoma Open Records Act.

1.31 SUPPORT OF STUDENTS AND TRAINEES BY COMPANIES  (Excerpted from the OUHSC Conflict of Interest Policy)

The progress and academic standing of students and trainees must never be compromised.  Employees supervising students and trainees must inform them in writing of the source(s) of their funding support, disposition of intellectual property, management of proprietary information, and handling of publication rights prior to assigning the students or trainees to a Research or training project supported by a Company.

A student’s academic program cannot be supported by a Company in which the supervising Employee has Equity, serves on a Board, or serves as an Operating Officer or Scientific Officer, unless specifically approved in writing by the Dean of the Graduate College and the Senior Vice President and Provost. If approved, support (e.g., stipends, tuition, salary, scholarships) for students and trainees provided by Companies must comply with all of the following provisions:

(a)      The College department, program, or unit approves the recipient;

(b)      The funds are provided to the University;

(c)       The recipient is not subject to any implicit or explicit expectation of providing or   

            foregoing something in return for the support; i.e., a “quid pro quo”; and

(d)       The Company does not withhold or unreasonably limit publication of the student’s

            research.

University trainees and students may not be employed by any Company to conduct Research that overlaps with their University training or academic program. In addition, Graduate College policy does not allow a faculty member with supervisory responsibility for an Employee to serve as mentor for the same individual as a student; therefore, any proposed employment of a trainee or student by a Company to work on Company Research that does not overlap with their training or academic program in which the mentor has Equity, serves on a Board, or serves as an Operating Officer or Scientific Officer of the Company must be approved in advance by the Dean of the Graduate College and the Senior Vice President and Provost.

1.32 PETITION FOR RESIDENCY POLICY

All non-residents of Oklahoma must pay nonresident tuition in addition to other tuition and fees and must meet nonresident admission criteria. The Residency Policy is found online at 

http://www.ouhsc.edu/admissions/Forms/respet.pdf

UNDERGRADUATE STUDENT RESEARCH POLICY

OU Norman Students:

College Credit: OU Norman undergraduate students may enroll in coursework that allows independent research with an OUHSC faculty member through intercampus enrollment. Credit hours earned are dependent upon hours spent on the OUHSC campus with the mentor. OUHSC courses will be listed on the Norman Campus studentís transcript. Intercampus enrollment must be processed by the OU Norman Registrarís Office.

Volunteer (No College Credit):

Undergraduate students from OU Norman may participate in experiential research with an OUHSC mentor. In this option the student does not enroll for credit for research experience. No tuition is charged by OUHSC and no college credit is earned. Student agrees to follow OUHSC and laboratory policies and procedures.
Consult the Graduate College website at http://graduate.ouhsc.edu/specialprograms/undergraduate-research-opportunities.html

Students from External Institutions:

College Credit: Undergraduate students from an accredited U.S. college or university must be accepted for enrollment as an OUHSC Graduate College Special Student to receive college credit for performing research with an OUHSC mentor. Studentís home institution must approve credit. Student is responsible for OUHSC tuition and fees.

Volunteer (No College Credit): Undergraduate students from an accredited U.S. college or university may participate in experiential research with an OUHSC mentor. In this option the student does not enroll for credit for research experience. No tuition is charged by OUHSC and no college credit is earned. Student agrees to follow OUHSC and laboratory policies and procedures.
Consult the Graduate College website at http://graduate.ouhsc.edu/specialprograms/undergraduate-research-opportunities.html

1.33 OTHER POLICIES AND PROCEDURES
Other University policies include the Smoking Policy, Teachers English Proficiency, Policy on Prevention of Alcohol Abuse and Drug Use on Campus and in the Workplace, and Security. All policies are available in the Student Handbook found online at http://www.admissions.OUHSC.edu/handbook/.

2.1 ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICERS
James J. Tomasek, Ph.D., Dean, Presidentís Associate Presidential Professor, David Ross Boyd Professor in Department of Cell Biology
Chris West, Ph.D., Assistant Dean for Summer Research Programs, Professor in the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Jane Pippin, Ph.D., Associate Dean
Eric Howard, Ph.D., Assistant Dean for the Graduate Program in Biomedical Sciences Associate Professor in the Department of Cell Biology
Ann L. Olson, Ph.D., Assistant Dean for Program Review, Co-Director of the MD/PhD Program, Associate Professor in the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

Dan Carr, Ph.D., Assistant Dean for Office of Postdoctoral Affiars, Professor in the Department of Opthalmology


2.2 GRADUATE COLLEGE STAFF
Karen Black Bentley, Assistant to the Dean
Becky Mosley, Sr. Administrative Manager

Katie Hudson, PhD, Assistant Director, GPiBS
Melissa Pinkston, Special Programs Coordinator Graduate Program in Biomedical Sciences (GPiBS)
Karolyn Ruffin, Special Programs Coordinator
Nicole Yi-Wohlers, Student Program Coordinator


2.3 GRADUATE LIAISONS 2014-1015
Kevin Rudeen, Ph.D., Allied Health Sciences (Doctoral)
Ann-Louise Olson, Ph.D., Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Julie Stoner, Ph.D., Biostatistics and Epidemiology
Jody Summers, Ph.D., Cell Biology
Julie Stoner, Ph.D., Clinical and Translational Science
Susan Hassed, Ph.D., Genetic Counseling
Sarah Buckingham, Ph.D., Communication Science and Disorders
Eric Howard, Ph.D., Graduate Program in Biomedical Sciences
Gary Raskob, Ph.D., Interim, Health Promotion Sciences
Stacy Anderson, M.S., Medical Dosimetry
Molly Hill, Ph.D., Microbiology and Immunology
James McGinnis, Ph.D., Neuroscience
Gary Loving, Ph.D., Nursing
Allen Knehans, Ph.D., Allied Health Sciences
Robert Lynch, Ph.D., Occupational and Environmental Health
Frans Currier, D.D.S., M.S.D, M.Ed., Orthodontics
Eros Chaves, D.D.S., M.S., D.M.D, M.B.A, Periodontics
Zhizhuang Zhao, Ph.D., Pathology
Nathan Sharnkar, Ph.D., Pharmaceutical Sciences
Siribhinya Benyajati, Ph.D., Physiology

Carol Dionne, Ph.D., , Allied Health Sciences (Masters)
Jagadeesh Sonnad, Ph.D., Radiological Sciences

2.4 GRADUATE COUNCIL 2014-2015
H. Anne Pereira, Ph.D., Dean and President
Jens Kreth, Ph.D., Medicine

Jo Azzarello, Ph.D., Nursing
Susan Sisson, Ph.D., Allied Health, Secretary
Michelle Callegan, Ph.D., Medicine, Vice President
Carol Dionne, Ph.D., Allied Health
John Dmytryk, D.D.S., Ph.D., Dentistry
Dimitrios Karamichos, Ph.D., Medicine
Jennifer Peck, Ph.D., Public Health
Shanjana Awasthi, Ph.D., Pharmacy
Guangpu Li, Ph.D., Medicine
Laura Beebe, Ph.D., Public Health

Francene Weatherby, Ph.D., Nursing

Dawn Kennedy, Neuroscience, GSA

Youngjae You, Ph.D., Pharmacy

Xin-Qin Ding, Ph.D., Medicine

2.5 GRADUATE FACULTY
Individuals participating in the teaching, research and service mission of graduate education must be appointed to the OUHSC Graduate Faculty. For more information see the Guidelines for Graduate Faculty Appointments at:
http://graduate.ouhsc.edu/newFacAppt/introhome.aspx

2.6 GRADUATE DEGREE AND CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS
The Graduate College offers both Master of Science and doctoral degrees in multiple disciplines. Requirements that apply to all of these degrees appear later in this bulletin. Information about individual degrees is available from the Graduate College or from the individual academic unit. The following departments or programs offer gdnoted:

2.6.1 Master of Science

Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Biostatistics
Cell Biology
Clinical and Translational Science
Epidemiology
Genetic Counseling
Health Promotion Sciences
Medical Dosimetry
Neuroscience
Nutritional Sciences
Occupational and Environmental Health

Orthodontics
Pathology
Periodontics
Pharmaceutical Sciences
Physiology
Radiological Sciences

 

2.6.2 Doctor of Philosophy
Allied Health Sciences
Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Biostatistics
Cell Biology
Communication Sciences and Disorders
Epidemiology
Health Administration and Policy
Health Promotion Sciences
Neuroscience
Nursing
Occupational and Environmental Health
Pathology
Pharmaceutical Sciences
Physiology
Radiological Sciences

2.6.3 Dual Degrees
PharmD/MS
Generic Dual Degree Programs
Students may pursue two pre-existing master's degree programs simultaneously. Refer to the master's degree section in this bulletin for additional information.

2.6.4 Accelerated Dual Degree Program
Students may combine the bachelor's degree with a master's or doctoral degree in an accelerated manner. Refer to the master's or doctoral degree section in this bulletin for additional information.

2.6.5 Certificate Programs
Graduate post masters certificates are available through the Department of Nursing in the Administration/Management, Clinical Nurse Specialist, Education and Nurse Practitioner pathways. The Post Masterís Certificate option allows a student with a Masterís degree in nursing to obtain a different nursing focus, without retaking select coursework traditionally found in all masterís degrees in nursing. A certificate student may transfer 25% of the coursework previously taken in a masterís degree in nursing into the post master certificate program. Please refer to the departmental section in this bulletin for additional information.

2.6.6 Specialization in Neuroscience
Students admitted to a degree-granting department may pursue a designation of "Specialization in Neuroscience" upon completion of the Ph.D. degree. Refer to the doctoral degree section of this bulletin for additional information.

2.6.7 M.D. /Ph.D. Degree Program
Students may individually design a program of study combining the M.D. degree with a Ph.D. degree. Refer to the doctoral degree section of this bulletin for additional information.

2.7 ADMISSION/APPLICATION
The preferred application method is online application specific to the college that houses the program to which the student is applying. ĎApply Yourselfí application is found at http://www.ouhsc.edu/admissions/applyonline.html.
Applicants are encouraged to submit all official transcript(s) and any applicable college supplemental materials within two weeks of submitting their application in order for application processing to occur in a timely manner.

Steps:

1. Visit the college or department web sites to review program requirements.

2. Review the college or department deadlines.

3. Complete the on-line application available at the following link: http://www.ouhsc.edu/admissions/applyonline.html . Required fees are noted in the on-line Application


4. Submit test scores.

5. Submit official sealed transcript(s) from all higher education institutions attended. All official transcript(s), enrollment verifications and/or class schedules should be mailed directly from the previous or current institution. Applicants should ensure the official transcript(s) contain current enrollment, as well as all previous grades. In cases where current enrollment is not posted to the applicantís transcript, the applicant should submit proof of enrollment by providing enrollment verification(s) with their classes listed or a class schedule from the institution. If providing an enrollment verification or class schedule, the applicant will need to have an official transcript mailed to the Office of Admissions and Records as soon as final grades are posted. Any applicant with foreign credentials is required to have their transcripts or marksheets evaluated course-by-course through WES (World Education Services) at the following web site: http://www.wes.org/. The Office of Admissions and Records will only accept a WES credential evaluation.

6. Submit recommendation letters and/or list of references, if requested by college or department. Refer to program requirements.

7. Submit Resume or Vitae and/or Statement of Career Goals, if requested by college or department. Refer to program requirements.

8. Submit Observation Form, if requested by college or department. Refer to program requirements.

9. Review the Application Status View web site to monitor the receipt and completion of all items submitted to the Office of Admission and Records.

2.8 TYPES OF ADMISSION

2.8.1 Full Standing
The University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center uses the 4.00 scale to calculate grade point averages, with an "A" equal to 4.0. An applicant must have a baccalaureate or entry level first professional degree from an accredited university or college and a 3.0 grade point average (4.0 scale) in the last 60 hours of course work applied to the degree. The applicant must be in good standing with the college or university where currently enrolled or last attended in order to be considered for admission in full standing to a degree program. If the applicant's transcript does not identify the last 60 hours, the entire transcript will be evaluated for admission. An applicant who has completed 12 hours or more of graded graduate level course work in an area related to the degree program of interest may be considered for admission. The applicant must have completed the course work at an accredited college or university with a 3.0 grade point average in all graduate work attempted and be in good standing with the college or university where currently enrolled or last attended. Additional academic work that is applicable to the degree program may be used in evaluating a student for admission into a graduate degree program.

An applicant presenting transcripts without a baccalaureate or entry level first professional degree posted may be admitted to a graduate degree program. An applicant admitted under these conditions must present an official transcript with the degree posted within the first semester of enrollment in the Graduate College. Failure to do so will result in a hold on future enrollment.

Except for those admitted as an unclassified or special student, the applicant must be
recommended by a department or program unit. The final decision for admission to any graduate program, either as a degree or non-degree student, is determined by the Dean of the Graduate College.

2.8.2 Probationary Admission
An applicant who does not meet the minimum grade point requirements for admission in full standing, may be considered for probationary admission to a degree program. Probationary admission to the degree program requires the recommendation of the department or program unit and approval of the Graduate dean. When the student has completed the terms of the probationary admission, the student will be classified as full standing in the degree program.
Admission of an applicant with a grade point average less than a 3.00 (2.75-2.99) may be made only in an unusual case. In such cases, admission will depend heavily on other indicators of the applicant's ability to do successful graduate level work. These indicators might include but are not limited to a strong performance on standardized tests, a high grade point average in the major, and/or subsequent experiences that clearly indicate strong academic ability.

A student admitted with a grade point average less than 3.00 must earn at least a 3.00 grade point average in the initial 9 hours of graded graduate course work. The 9 hours must be courses required for the degree. It is expected these courses will be completed within one calendar year following initial enrollment.

2.8.3 Unclassified Students
The Graduate College no longer accepts unclassified students.

2.8.4 Special Students
An applicant must meet the requirements for admission into the Graduate College. Please read directions carefully as the application fee is non-refundable. The Graduate College allows Special Student acceptance only under very restricted circumstances. Most individuals accepted need one specific course for professional advancement such as recertification. Special Student acceptance is not granted to students who wish to take courses to enhance their application to advanced degree programs or who are waiting to apply to or reapply to advanced degree programs. Enrollment is limited to 12 semester hours. All other students taking Graduate College courses must be accepted into a Graduate College degree granting program. Application and procedure to apply as a Special student is located online at:
http://www.ouhsc.edu/admissions/Forms/SPECSTUF.pdf .

2.8.5 Postdoctoral Fellows
Postdoctoral fellows who have received a doctoral degree from an accredited institution may be admitted as an unclassified graduate student by completing a Postdoctoral Fellow and Resident Application found on the Admissions and Records website http://www.ouhsc.edu/admissions/Forms/SPECSTUF.pdf under Application Information.

Fellows who wish to be admitted to a degree program must follow the normal admission requirements for all graduate students. If a Postdoctoral fellow wishes to enroll as a degree-seeking student within the same department, they cannot teach graduate level courses in that department.

2.8.6 Currently Enrolled University of Oklahoma Norman Students
Currently enrolled undergraduate and graduate students from the University of Oklahoma Norman campus who wish to apply for admission to a graduate program should contact the Office of Admissions and Records, Room 200, Basic Sciences Education Building, for application instructions. Once the application file is complete, their academic records will be referred to the Graduate College and to their prospective major departments for consideration. Enrollment as a student on the Norman Campus does not insure admission to a Health Sciences Center degree program. Once admitted, undergraduate students must notify the Graduate College if they have failed to complete any requirements for the undergraduate degree. If any requirements have not been completed, the admission will be canceled and the student must reapply for admission.

2.8.7 International Students
International applicants must fully meet the academic requirements for admission to the university, college and department; satisfy the English proficiency requirement and verify adequate financial support. International applicants and students are not eligible for financial aid through the university. All international and permanent resident applicants must fulfill the following requirements:

1. Meet the same admission criteria as required for American citizens.

2. Score 550 or higher on the TOEFL. This is waived for applicants from countries where English is the official language. Consult the Summary of OUHSC Graduate Program Requirements Chart for departments requiring a higher TOEFL score or TWE (Test of Written English) scores. Scores cannot be more than 2 years old. Applicants with a U.S. high school diploma or with a four-year U.S. baccalaureate degree may submit a TOEFL Waiver Request Form to the Registrarís Office.

3. Submit certified copies of transcripts from the university baccalaureate level work and certified copies of degrees awarded.

4. Present acceptable evidence of financial adequacy to pursue a course of study at OUHSC (for F-1 students) International students for whom English is a second language and who serve as graduate teaching assistants must demonstrate proficiency in both oral and written English.

2.8.8 Reserved Admission and Readmission
Upon being admitted to the Graduate College, prospective students are expected to enroll in courses at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center in the semester they are admitted. Upon the request of the department or dean, the Office of Admission and Records will hold admission for up to one year. Students are subject to the regulations in effect during their first term of enrollment so long as they maintain continuous enrollments.

Graduate students who interrupt their enrollment in the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center for more than one year must reapply for admission. If readmitted, they will be subject to the regulations in effect at the time of readmission.

2.8.9 Change of Degree or Major
Students in good academic standing may request to change degree options within a program or transfer to another graduate program at the Health Sciences Center by completing a Request for Change of College, Major or Degree Option form. The request must be approved by all programs involved, the college dean, and the Graduate dean. Students on probationary status must move to full-standing status and have an overall graduate grade point average of 3.0 or greater prior to initiating a request for change of status.

2.9 GRADUATE ASSISTANTS
A graduate student enrolled in an M.S. or Ph.D. degree program can be appointed as a Graduate Assistant (GA) by the Graduate College. The primary responsibility of a GA is participation in the research and teaching effort of the department or program. The work must contribute to the graduate/professional education of the student and to fulfillment of requirements for the graduate degree. Graduate Assistants are categorized as Graduate Assistants, (GA ís), Graduate Research Assistants (GRA's) or Graduate Teaching Assistants (GTA's) and are defined according to the studentís responsibilities.

GAs, GRAs, and GTAs may be eligible for a non-resident tuition waiver in accordance with Oklahoma State Regents policy. A student must be appointed a GA, GRA, or GTA by the first day of class in order to receive a non-resident tuition waiver for that semester.

The Internal Revenue Service grants student status to all GAís, GRAís, and GTAís with half-time enrollment. IRS defines half-time enrollment as 5 credit hours for fall and spring semesters and 2 credit hours for the summer semester. If the enrollment drops below this, the student must be reclassified as an employee and will no longer be considered a GA, GRA, or GTA.

2.9.1 Graduate Assistant
The primary responsibility is participation in work that contributes to the educational process and development of the student.

2.9.2 Graduate Research Assistant
The primary responsibility is participation in the research effort of the department and graduate program. The work must contribute to fulfilling requirements for completing the degree.

2.9.3 Graduate Teaching Assistant
The primary responsibility is the teaching effort of the department and its contribution to student development.

To be appointed a GA, GRA or GTA, the student must meet the following requirements:

1. Student must be enrolled full-time. Full-time enrollment for a GA is defined as 6 credit hours for fall and spring semesters and 3 credit hours for the summer term.
2. Appointed to work 10 - 20 hours per week (0.25 to 0¨.50 FTE).
3. Work appointed for must be related to the program of study.
4. Student must receive a minimum stipend of $500 per calendar month. The Graduate College determines the maximum amount that can be earned annually. Students may not receive a stipend that exceeds the annually established maximum without prior approval of the dean of their college

2.9.4 GA Appointment Outside Studentís Degree-Granting Department
If the GA, GRA, or GTA appointment is with a faculty member who does not hold an appointment in the studentís degree- granting department, the hiring department should initiate the GA Authorization Form found online at http://graduate.ouhsc.edu/gradcollege/documents/GA_AppointmentAuthorizationForm_electronicsignature_000.pdf. If the chair supports the appointment, completed documents should be forwarded to the Graduate College dean who will approve the appointment if the work experience is directly related to the program of study and degree requirements.

The GA, GRA, or GTA appointment will be in the hiring department. The appointment must meet all requirements, policies and procedures defined by the degree-granting department for GA, GRA, and GTA appointments in the department.

The following documentation is included on the authorization form:

1) A detailed description of duties and how they are related to the program of study.
2) Description of the purpose and scope of the project on which the student would work.
3) Identification of the department and college where the project is located.
4) Identification of the faculty member who supervises the work and definition of the faculty memberís association with the primary department and/or education.
5) List of skills that will be developed or learned that are directly related to the graduate program objectives.
6) Statement by student addressing how this experience will enhance the studentís career objectives, including specific and measurable outcomes (i.e., professional presentations, publications, etc.).
7) Statement by the supervising faculty member confirming the scope of the work, its relevance to the program of study, the stipend amount and % time appointed.

2.10 ENROLLMENT POLICIES

2.10.1 Full-Time and Maximum Enrollment
Full-time enrollment for graduate students is nine semester hours during the fall and spring semesters and four semester hours during the summer sessions. Students may not carry more than 16 hours per semester for graduate credit or more than nine semester hours per summer session without permission of the Graduate dean.

2.10.2 Enrollment During General, Comprehensive, or Final Examinations, or Defense
Students must enroll in at least two graduate credit hours during the semester in which they take the general or comprehensive examination, or when defending their thesis or dissertation. Thesis/dissertation students must maintain continuous enrollment in 5980 or 6980 until the final copies are deposited with the library.

2.10.3 Enrollment of Undergraduate Students in Graduate Courses
Undergraduate juniors or seniors at the University of Oklahoma who have a cumulative GPA of 3.0 or greater may enroll in graduate level courses. Approval is required from the advisor, department, and Graduate dean. Undergraduates desiring graduate credit for a course must have a minimum overall grade point average of 3.00 and complete and return to the Graduate College the Application for Graduate Credit for Courses taken during the Junior and Senior Year. Students must receive permission to enroll in the course for graduate credit from the instructor, the department offering the course, and the Graduate dean. Approval of the instructor will signify that the junior or senior will be graded in competition with the graduate students in the class. The application must be completed and returned to the Graduate College Office with the signed approvals noted above before or during the first two weeks of classes of the semester during which the course will be taken.

When the student has completed the bachelor's degree, the Graduate College will request the student's undergraduate college to verify that the course was not required for the bachelor's degree and that the student earned either A, B, or S in the course. Credit for courses so listed may not be applied toward the bachelor's degree.

Each graduate degree program has a prescribed set of courses required for the degree and not all graduate level courses can be applied to fulfill those requirements. Before enrolling in graduate level courses, the student who plans to work toward a graduate degree in a department should consult with the department to plan an appropriate program of study.

2.10.4 Health Sciences Center Students Enrolling in Norman Campus Courses
To enroll in Norman campus courses, Health Sciences Center students must receive permission from their HSC college. The HSC Admissions and Records process all enrollments, adding and/or dropping courses. Norman campus courses will be listed on the HSC student's transcript. For further information, contact the HSC Office of Admissions and Records, 271-1539.


2.10.5 Faculty and Staff Graduate Enrollment

To prevent a conflict of interest between the role of student and the role of faculty or staff, the following policy applies to all OUHSC faculty and staff enrolled in Graduate College course work and programs at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center.

A faculty member may enroll in Graduate College course work as a Special Student. †If the course work is in a department in which the faculty member has an appointment, the faculty member must enroll for audit.† A faculty member may not enroll for credit and cannot be admitted into a degree program in a department in which he or she holds a faculty appointment or in an academic area of his or her faculty expertise unless the following conditions are met:

1) The faculty memberís graduate program must be for a degree higher than the one currently held.

2) The departmental chair or program director in which the faculty member holds an appointment must submit a plan to manage any potential conflict of interest.† The plan must be approved by the deans of the Graduate College and the College in which the faculty member holds an appointment.

3) A full time faculty member cannot be paid as a graduate student or receive a student grant.

4)† The faculty member must relinquish voting privileges in the department or program in which he or she holds a Graduate Faculty appointment and recuse themselves from any meeting discussing items related to their Graduate College program while a student.

Staff may enroll in graduate course work as Special Student. If a staff member is admitted to a degree program within the academic unit in which he or she is employed, the following conditions must apply:

1)† A staff member may not enroll for credit in a course that is taught by a faculty member who has supervisory authority over the staff member's employment. An exception can be made for a required course taught only by the faculty supervisor if approved by the Graduate College dean.

1) The staff memberís work and responsibility as an employee must be different from his or her work and responsibility as a student.

2) If the staff member is employed for research effort, the research activity for which the staff member receives payment as an employee cannot be used to meet thesis or dissertation requirements.

3) The criteria for the evaluation of the staff member as an employee must be identified and differentiated from the criteria for the evaluation of the staff member as a student.

4) A full time staff member cannot be paid as a graduate student or receive a student grant.†

5) It is the responsibility of the thesis/dissertation chair and committee members to be certain that these conditions are met and to monitor for any potential conflict of interest and bring it to the attention of the Graduate dean.†

6) The faculty member with supervisory responsibility for the staff member as an employee cannot chair the staff memberís graduate committee unless the following conditions are met:†

a) Prior approval must be requested by the thesis/dissertation chair and approved by the department chair or program director and the Graduate dean.

2.10.6 Norman Campus Students Enrolling in Graduate College Courses
In that all courses at the HSC require special permission, Norman campus students are advised to secure that permission from the HSC instructor before beginning the enrollment process. Once permission has been obtained, Norman campus student should contact the Office of Admissions and Records, Buchanan Hall, Norman campus. HSC courses will be listed on the Norman campus student's transcript. For further information, contact the Office of Admissions and Records, in Norman at 325-5983.

2.10.7 Auditor
Audit enrollment is for non-credit and used by students who want to take a class for information, not to count toward a degree. Students enrolling as an auditor must meet guidelines as outlined below. Enrollment as an auditor is permitted in all courses, subject to the approval of the instructor(s) and the dean of the college in which the course(s) is offered. Enrollment as an auditor must be completed by the last day of enrollment in any term.

Enrollment as an auditor is indicated with an "AU" or "W" grade on the student's permanent academic record and no credit/clock hour values designated. Fee charges and refund policies for audit enrollments are the same as for credit enrollments. Students enrolled "exclusively" as auditors may withdraw only during the fee refund period and the enrollment will be canceled. No entry will be made on a permanent academic record.

In accepting a student as an auditor, it becomes the responsibility of the instructor to make clear to the student the instructor's requirements for the audit enrollment. For example, if the student is to attend regularly, to participate in specific class exercises, perform experiments, take tests, etc., this must be relayed to the student at the time permission is given to enroll as an auditor. Satisfactory completion of the audit enrollment is identified as an "AU" grade. An instructor, at his/her discretion, may assign a "W" grade to an auditor who, in the instructor's opinion, did not perform according to the specific requirements as identified at the time of enrollment.

Students enrolled exclusively as an auditor may change their enrollment to "credit," providing the student gains admission to the university during the first two weeks of classes of a semester or the first week of classes of a summer session with the approval of the instructor(s) and appropriate college dean.

A change of enrollment from "credit" to "audit" may be made no later than the end of the sixth week of classes of a semester or the end of the third week of classes of a summer session, providing the student is passing and receives the approval of the instructor and the appropriate dean. A change of enrollment to audit supersedes the original enrollment for credit, and no withdrawal from the credit enrollment is posted to the student's permanent record. For more information, contact Admissions and Records, BSEB 200 or 271-1539.

2.10.8 Class Attendance
Only officially enrolled students (either for credit or audit) may attend class. Each student is responsible for the content of courses in which he or she is enrolled. Specific policies concerning attendance requirements, announced, and unannounced examinations are the responsibility of the individual instructor. If absences seriously affect a student's class work, the instructor is required to report this fact to the appropriate dean, who will transmit the information to the Office of Admissions and Records. Classes are not to be dismissed or rescheduled for extracurricular functions.

2.10.9 Request for Leave of Absence
Students may request a leave of absence from their graduate studies for up to but not to exceed 12 consecutive months (three consecutive academic terms). Leave of absence has no effect on time limits for expected graduation. The student should complete the ĎStudent Leave Requestí form found on the Admissions and Records website found at http://www.ouhsc.edu/admissions/Forms/StudentLeaveRequest.pdf . The request must be approved by the studentís graduate advisor, department chair, and Graduate dean. Students on probationary status, if granted a leave of absence, will resume their probationary status upon return from their leave. Students receiving financial aid may be required to return a portion of the aid. They must check with their financial aid officer.

2.10.10 Withdrawing and Dropping Courses
Students should contact their department to initiate the drop or withdrawal procedure. Withdrawing from the Health Sciences Center refers to withdrawing from all enrolled courses for a given term. Dropping refers to the dropping of one or more courses while remaining enrolled in at least one course for a given term. Consult the class schedule for grading regulations and deadlines relative to withdrawals and drops. Withdrawing or dropping courses may require students receiving financial aid to return a portion of the aid received. Students must check with their financial aid officer. Appropriate forms found at http://www.admissions.ouhsc.edu/forms.html.

Drop:
During the first two weeks of class (first week of a summer session), no record of a grade on a dropped course will be recorded. From the third through sixth week of class (second and third week of summer), an automatic grade of W will be assigned to each course the student is dropping. From the seventh through 10th week (fourth and fifth week of summer), a grade of W (passing but indicating student withdrew from the course) or F (not passing) is submitted by the course director according to Graduate College grading policy guidelines. Grades of A, B, C, and S are passing or satisfactory grades and grades of D, F or U are failing grades in the Graduate College. From the 11th week through the last day of classes (sixth week through the last day of class in the summer), a petition to the Graduate College dean requesting permission to drop a course is required. The petition should outline the specific reason(s) for dropping the course(s). If the dean approves the drop, the course instructor renders a grade of W or F (following the above Graduate College grading policy guidelines) that reflects the studentís letter grade at the time of the drop request.

Withdraw:
The transcript of students withdrawing prior to the beginning of the semester will not reflect enrollment in the courses. From the third through sixth week of class (second and third week of summer), an automatic grade of W will be assigned to each course the student is withdrawing from. From the seventh week through the last day of class (fourth week through last day of class in summer), a grade of W (passing but indicating student withdrew from the course) or F (not passing) is rendered by the course director according to Graduate College grading policy guidelines that reflects the studentís letter grade at the time of the drop request. Grades of A, B, C, and S are passing or satisfactory grades and grades of D, F or U are failing grades in the Graduate College.

Administrative Withdrawal
An administrative withdrawal (AW) may be assigned to indicate that a student has been "involuntarily" withdrawn by the institution during the designated semester for disciplinary or financial reasons or inadequate attendance. Such institutional penalties must follow formal institutional procedures. Administrative withdrawals are GPA neutral.

2.11 GRADES

2.11.1 Course Credit in the Graduate College
Course work taken at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center which is to be applied toward fulfilling requirements for a graduate degree must be approved for graduate credit and recommended by the Advisory Committee.

2.11.2 Grades of A, B, C, D, and F
The grades A, B, C, D, and F are used in computing grade point averages. In the Graduate College the grades of A, B, C, and S are the only passing or satisfactory grades, and the grades of D, F and U are failing. Students who receive a D, F or U grade in a required course must register for the required course the next time it is offered. In such re-enrollment, both grades will be shown on the student's academic record and both will be included in the grade point average calculation. Any student presenting credit from another institution for a course previously failed at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center shall not receive credit for such courses except through validation by the department in which the course was originally failed and approval by the Graduate dean. It is the prerogative of each college and/or department to establish grade requirements above the Graduate College minimum.

2.11.3 Grades of S and U
The grade of S (satisfactory) is a neutral passing grade. The grade of U (unsatisfactory) is used to indicate that no credit will be given for the course. These grades may be used for seminar courses provided they are taught on a non-competitive basis and all students in the class are graded on this basis. The S grade is the only passing grade accepted for special problem courses, individual research, and directed reading courses. The S grade may not be used for lecture recitation courses except with the expressed approval of the Graduate dean.

2.11.4 Grade of I
The grade of I (incomplete) is a neutral grade. It is not an alternative to an earned letter grade, but is intended as a temporary grade to be used for a student who, for reasons satisfactory to the instructor, is unable to complete certain identifiable requirements of a course and who cannot be assigned any other grade. Typical instances might be absence from a final examination due to illness or inability to submit a term project due to extenuating circumstances. "Incomplete" is not an acceptable explanation of the I grade.

The instructor will indicate to the student what must be done to complete the course, will set a time limit appropriate to the circumstances and will define the grade to be assigned. Students cannot attend the scheduled course at a future offering in order to complete the I grade.

If by the end of one year no change in grade has been submitted, the grade of I will become permanent on the student's record. After a grade of I has become permanent, the student may re-enroll in the course. Credit for courses in which a student has received an I at the University of Oklahoma cannot be completed at or transferred from another institution. If the student graduates with a grade of I on the record, it becomes permanent.

2.11.5 Grades of X, S, and U for Enrollment in Thesis and Dissertation Research
The grade of X is a neutral conditional grade and indicates that satisfactory progress is being made on thesis and dissertation research courses 5980 and 6980. It is a complete grade when the final entry is either Satisfactory (S) or Unsatisfactory (U), indicating either acceptance or rejection of the thesis or dissertation. An intermediate grade of U indicating unsatisfactory progress in thesis or dissertation research may be given if circumstances warrant. The grade of X is included in hours attempted and hours earned.

2.11.6 Grade of W
Students withdrawing from all courses in the first two weeks of class (the first week of a summer session) receive a W in each course of enrollment. For complete withdrawals occurring after the second week of class (first week of summer session), the instructor will assign a grade of W or F for each course.

Students withdrawing from one or more courses but not all courses in the first two weeks of class (first week of summer) no grade is recorded; from the third week through the sixth week of class (second and third week of summer) a W will be assigned to each dropped course. From the seventh through 10th week (fourth and fifth week of summer) the instructor of each course dropped will assign a W or F. Beginning with the11th week of class (sixth week of the summer session) through the last day of classes courses may be dropped only by direct petition to the dean of the student's college. Students who drop a course with permission of the dean will receive a final grade of W or F at the discretion of the instructor of the course dropped.

2.11.7 Repeat Coursework
Students cannot repeat course work in which they have received a passing grade (A,B,C, or S). Exceptions can be made for student's receiving a C grade if the program requires a grade of A or B in a specific course. A request from the program must be approved by the Graduate dean. Both the original grade and the repeat grade will be included in the calculation of the graduate GPA.

2.11.8 Transfer Credit
The acceptance of transfer credit from another institution for a graduate degree program at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center is determined in accordance with the criteria as outlined in the Master's, Doctoral and Certificate Programs section of this bulletin.

2.11.9 Grade Point System
Each hour of A, B, C, D, and F carries a grade point value as follows: A-4, B-3, C-2, D-1 and F-0. Grades of S, I, X, U, and W carry no grade point value and are not included in the computation of a student's semester or cumulative grade point average.

2.11.10 Correcting Grades Reported in Error
The instructor initiates the change by filing a Faculty Request for Grade Change form with the Office of Admissions and Records through the college under which the course was taught.


2.12 STANDARDS OF PERFORMANCE AND EVALUATION

2.12.1 Graduate College Standards
The Graduate College is responsible for review of the performance of graduate students in accordance with the guidelines described in this bulletin. The Graduate College monitors the students' academic progress and at the end of each semester or summer session notifies students about their status if they fail to meet the standards of performance required by the Graduate College.

All graduate students, regardless of admission status, are required to maintain a grade point average of 3.00 or greater in all graduate course work completed. If a student's academic record includes enrollment in more than one graduate degree and/or certificate program, the student must maintain a grade point average of 3.00 or greater in each program. The total number of credit hours of C grade which can be applied toward a graduate degree and/or certificate cannot exceed 25 % of the total letter graded course work required for the degree and/or certificate.

2.12.2 Academic Probation
Students who fail to maintain an overall grade point average of 3.00 in all graduate courses attempted will be placed on academic probation. Students will also be placed on probation if they fail to maintain satisfactory progress as determined by their annual evaluation or in receiving the grade of U in 5980 or 6980.

Students placed on academic probation for low GPA will be evaluated at the end of each subsequent semester. The probationary status will remain until the student raises their overall graduate GPA to 3.00 or higher. The probationary requirements must be completed within 9 credit hours of graded graduate course work or one calendar year from being placed on probation, whichever comes first. This is the probationary period, during which students must demonstrate satisfactory progress in improving their cumulative grade point average. Students placed on probation for a grade of U in 5980 or 6980 or for failure to maintain satisfactory progress will be evaluated at the end of the following semester. The grades of D, F, or U may be grounds for dismissal prior to completing the probationary period.

At the end of the probationary period, students who achieve a 3.00 cumulative grade point average and/or regain satisfactory progress will be returned to full or unclassified status and will be allowed to continue their enrollment. Those who fail to achieve a cumulative grade point average of at least 3.00 for all courses awarding grade points may be denied further enrollment after this probationary period. If students merit an extension of the probationary period, the extension will be considered a second probationary period and the time limit will be specified by the Graduate dean but may not exceed two consecutive academic terms.

If a student fails to maintain a 3.00 grade point average and the rules require probation for a third time, the student will be denied further enrollment and will be dismissed from the Graduate College.

2.12.3 Departmental Standards

Departments or other academic units may have additional and more stringent criteria for evaluating their students' performance and progress and they may demand a higher level of performance than that required by the Graduate College. Under certain circumstances, a department or program unit may recommend dismissal of a student from a graduate program even though a 3.00 grade point average has been maintained. Grounds for dismissal include but are not limited to (1) failure to make timely progress toward the degree or (2) failure to perform in course work, qualifying examination, or research at an acceptable level in the respective department or program unit. These guidelines are stipulated in the departmental documents.

2.12.4 Departmental Annual Review of Student Progress

Departments shall conduct an annual review and evaluation of their students' progress in meeting degree requirements. Each department shall establish a graduate student review procedure to coordinate and forward all reviews to the students and Graduate dean. The review must be conducted by graduate faculty authorized to chair committees at the level of the students to be evaluated. Any exceptions to this requirement must receive prior written approval of the Graduate dean. Annual reviews are to be conducted prior to the fall semester.

(1) Criteria. The review may include, but is not limited to, considerations such as progress toward meeting conditions of admission; completion within the prescribed period of time of those courses in which the student has received the grade of I; completion of core course requirements; completion of research tool requirements; progress toward completing research requirements; timely filing of the prospectus; the general quality of research; and completion of the thesis or dissertation. The review also may encompass the student's broader scholarly capabilities and professional development.

(2) Procedure. The department will make this review annually and notify each student in writing of the student's progress and performance toward satisfying degree requirements. If there are deficient areas, the department must specify clearly what each student must do to receive a satisfactory evaluation and specify a time for a second review. A copy of this letter must be sent to the Graduate dean. The Graduate dean will review the student's total record and, if appropriate, the student will be placed on probation.

(3) Second Review. The Graduate dean and the department will conduct a second review for all students placed on probation. In this second review, the department will determine if (a) the student is making satisfactory progress; (b) the student's level of performance is unsatisfactory and the student is ineligible for further enrollment; or (c) the department believes the student's progress is still unsatisfactory but wishes to petition the Graduate dean to continue the student on probation for an additional semester or summer session. The student and the Graduate dean will be notified in writing of the results of this second review. The Graduate dean may either remove the student from probation, deny the student further enrollment, or continue the student on probation for an additional semester. When application of the above rules requires the student to go on probation a third time, the student will be denied further enrollment.


2.12.5 Residence Requirements
The primary purpose of residence requirements is to encourage the educational and professional development of individuals seeking advanced degrees. The opportunity for the student to associate with the faculty and other students in the University community, to utilize the facilities on the campus, and to take advantage of a wide variety of cultural opportunities justifies a relatively extended campus stay. In addition, the University must be in a position to oversee the development of the candidate, especially during the formal preparation for the General Examination.

The student must be in residence at the University of Oklahoma and engaged in course work or research activities prescribed by the major department for at least two regular semesters. Exceptions can be made for degrees provided by distance education through electronic media.

2.12.6 Qualifying for an Advanced Degree or Certificate
To qualify for a graduate degree or certificate, students must achieve an overall grade point average of 3.00 or higher in all graduate level courses comprising a part of the graduate program. The grade of S, U, I, and X for which no grade points are awarded are considered neutral in determining the graduating grade point average. Credit by advanced standing examinations will not apply toward graduate degrees.

2.13 GRADUATE ACADEMIC APPEALS
The Graduate College hears all appeals involving qualifying examinations, comprehensive examinations, general examinations, 5980 (thesis) or (6980) dissertation courses and/or disagreements that may jeopardize the continued enrollment of the student in the Graduate College or graduate program, and other matters of controversy not specifically covered in the Student Handbook. Such appeals must be filed in writing and given to the Graduate dean within 60 days of the time of action from which the dispute arose. Graduate students with grievances should immediately contact the Graduate College to obtain more details about the appeals procedure.

2.14 RESPONSIBLE CONDUCT OF RESEARCH
Effective for all incoming Graduate College students in spring 2009 and thereafter, all students must receive training in Responsible Conduct of Research. The level of training in Responsible Conduct of Research is dependent upon the degree program. Training for doctoral students must occur prior to enrolling in doctoral dissertation research. RCR training for thesis masters students must occur prior to enrolling in masterís thesis research. For non-thesis masterís students, training must occur prior to approval to take the comprehensive examination. Programs must submit a yearly proposal to the Graduate College Responsible Conduct of Research Committee as to how their students will meet this requirement by June 1 of for the upcoming academic year.


2.15 GRADUATE AWARDS FOR ACADEMIC EXCELLENCE

One Outstanding Masterís Thesis and one Outstanding Doctoral Dissertation Award is presented annually to reward excellence in research. Each department nominates one thesis and/or dissertation to compete for these prestigious awards. The Research and Graduate Student Affairs Committee of the Graduate Council selects these awards. Winners are presented a certificate and cash award at the OUHSC Campus Awards Ceremony.

The Graduate College and the Graduate Student Association annually sponsor the Graduate Research, Technology, and Education Symposium (GREAT) where graduate students present oral and poster presentations describing current original research projects. Travel grants and trophies are awarded for winning presentations.

The Graduate College awards the O. Ray Kling Award for Outstanding Graduate Student Leadership each year at the OUHSC Campus Awards Ceremony. This award is named in honor of Dr. O Ray Kling, Dean of the Graduate College from 1990-2002. It is given annually to the graduate student who best embodies Dr. Klingís commitment to the hallmarks of graduate education at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center. A committee named by the dean of the Graduate College annually evaluates graduate students for this award based upon leadership among peers, service to graduate students in the Graduate College, academic accomplishments, intellectual honesty and curiosity, and achievements in research.

2.16 GRADUATION CEREMONY

The official commencement for all graduate students is held on the Norman campus each spring. Diplomas are awarded three times a year. Students should complete the graduation application at the time they enroll for their last semester. Additional information can be found in the Master's and Doctoral degree sections of this bulletin.

2.17 OPTIONAL PRACTICAL TRAINING FOR INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS (OPT)


International graduate students may request to receive optional practical (OPT) training after their graduate education. Graduate students are highly discouraged from starting their optional practical training (OPT) prior to completing their degree requirement. OPT status prohibits any type of student employment; therefore, a graduate student with OPT status may not hold a Graduate Assistant position and will no longer be eligible to receive a stipend or be eligible for a non-resident tuition waiver, and must pay tuition at the non-resident rate. In addition, once a graduate student has OPT status the graduate mentor is no longer required to pay the studentís tuition, fees, or health insurance.

Any Graduate Assistant requesting OPT must meet with a member of the Graduate College; this meeting must include their dissertation mentor. This meeting will discuss the ramifications of choosing a specific date for the student to start their OPT. OUHSC International Student Services will not process a request for OPT for a Graduate Assistant without a signature from a member of the Graduate College approving the start date.

OPT does allow a student to hold a professional position; however, the student must receive written approval from the degree granting department and comply with all Graduate College academic policies outlined in the Graduate College Bulletin.

2.18 GRADUATE STUDENT TRAVEL POLICY
A graduate student is both a student and researcher. The role the student assumes while traveling determines if it is a taxable student expense or a business expense. Specific guidelines for determination if travel is taxable by the government are found on the Graduate College webpage at http://graduate.ouhsc.edu/gradcollege/documents/StudentTravelFINAL4.13.pdf under Policies and Procedures~ Student ~ Student Travel Policy.

2.19 UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH OPPORTUNTIES WITH HSC MENTORS

2.19.1 Students from OU Norman (Two Options)

College Credit: OU Norman undergraduate students may enroll in coursework that allows independent research with an OUHSC faculty member through intercampus enrollment. Credit hours earned are dependent upon hours spent on the OUHSC campus with the mentor. OUHSC courses will be listed on the Norman Campus studentís transcript. The student and or faculty member from Norman communicates directly with an OUHSC mentor. Intercampus enrollment is processed by the OU Norman Enrollment Office. Courses available are:

BMSC 4990 Undergraduate Research
BMSC 3980 Undergraduate Honors Research (Honors Students Only)
BMSC 3960 Undergraduate Honors Research (Honors Students Only)

No College Credit: Undergraduate students from OU Norman may participate in experiential research with an OUHSC mentor. The student and or faculty member from Norman communicates directly with an OUHSC mentor but does not enroll for course. No tuition is charged by OUHSC and no college credit is earned. Student agrees to follow OUHSC and laboratory policies and procedures.

Detailed information may be found on the Graduate College website at http://graduate.ouhsc.edu/specialprograms/undergraduate-research-opportunities.html under Policies and Procedures ~ Student~ Undergraduate Research.
2.19.2 Students from External institutions (Two Options):

College Credit: Undergraduate students an accredited U.S. college must be accepted as an OUHSC Graduate College Special Student and receive college credit with approval from the studentís home institution. The student is responsible for OUHSC application fees, tuition, and fees and must agree to follow OUHSC and laboratory policies and procedures.

No College Credit: Undergraduate students from an accredited U.S. college or university may participate in volunteer research with an OUHSC researcher. No tuition is charged and no college credit is earned. Student agrees to follow OUHSC and laboratory policies and procedures.

Detailed information may be found on the Graduate College website at http://graduate.ouhsc.edu/specialprograms/undergraduate-research-opportunities.html

2.20 SUMMER UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH PROGRAMS
The OUHSC Graduate College hosts three summer undergraduate research programs (SURPs) aimed at preparing and encouraging undergraduate students to pursue careers in biomedical research or health related sciences. These 9-week programs are designed to offer outstanding undergraduate students intensive, hands-on research opportunities in the laboratories of select OUHSC biomedical faculty mentors. These programs introduce students to the rigorous academic preparation required for biomedical research careers. Tuition is waived and a stipend provided, three hours college credit is earned and housing is provided. The three programs currently housed on the OUHSC campus are:

ē The Summer Undergraduate Research Experience (SURE)
ē The Native American Research Center for Health (NARCH) Student Development Program
ē The IDeA Network for Biomedical Research Excellence (INBRE) Summer Research Program

Detailed information on each program and application deadlines are found on the Graduate College website at http://graduate.ouhsc.edu/specialprograms/summer-undergrad-programs.html


Masterís Degree Programs

3.1 MASTER OF SCIENCE DEGREE (MS)
The Master of Science (MS) degree is awarded in recognition of the successful completion of substantial post-baccalaureate study in a chosen field. It may be a course of study designed to serve as a foundation for more advanced work leading to the doctoral degree.

The master's degree requires the equivalent of no less than two semesters of satisfactory graduate work and such additional work as may be prescribed for the degree by the major department. The requirement for a thesis is determined by the department offering the degree. The thesis program consists of at least 30 hours, with no more than six semester hours for Research for Master's Thesis (course 5980) included in the 30 hours. The non-thesis program consists of at least 32 hours. Students should consult specific departmental requirements found elsewhere in this bulletin. Credit hours previously presented and counted for one master's degree may not be applied toward satisfying the requirements of a second master's degree, with the exception of approved dual-degree programs.

When permitted by departmental policy, students who do not hold the master's degree in the doctoral field, but who have passed the General Examination for the doctoral degree, may be awarded the appropriate master's degree provided they make formal application for the master's degree upon passing the General Examination, meet all departmental requirements, and secure the recommendation of the major department and approval of the Graduate dean. The University of Oklahoma normally does not grant a second master's degree in the same field from which the individual already holds a master's degree.

3.2 MASTER'S DUAL DEGREES PROGRAM
The generic dual degree program will permit students to select from already existing master's degree programs to officially pursue, when appropriate, two master's degrees simultaneously. This program allows students to tailor electives and areas of emphasis to meet their educational goals through the Health Sciences Center and the Norman campus. Students must be admitted to both programs before 12 credit hours of program work are completed in either program. All requirements for the degrees, including research tools, foreign languages, comprehensive examination, thesis, and deficiencies, must be met for both programs. Up to 20% of the total graduate credits required for both degrees may be double counted. The student must graduate with both degrees the same semester.

3.3 ACCELERATED DUAL DEGREE PROGRAM
The accelerated dual degree program establishes a framework of rules by which academic units may offer students the option of earning combined bachelor's and graduate degrees in an accelerated manner. The program allows students with 30 hours of advanced standing credit to earn both the bachelor's and the master's degrees within three to four years of matriculation. Interested applicants should contact the academic programs of interest to design a degree plan.

3.4 SPECIAL MASTER'S DEGREE PROGRAM
Because departmental majors do not always provide for the needs of students desiring unusual training or combinations of courses, consideration will be given to proposals for special programs of study leading to the master's degree. The guidelines given below must be followed in implementing this degree program:

(1) The student must be admitted in full standing to a graduate program authorized by the State Regents to award a master's degree.

(2) The student must submit to the Graduate dean a written request for approval of a special program prior to the completion of the first 12 graduate hours of enrollment. The request must include: (a) a two-page rationale for the program; (b) a proposed degree designation; (c) proposed courses; and (d) a proposed thesis topic, if the thesis option is chosen. This request must be signed by three graduate faculty members who agree to serve as the student's Advisory Committee. The request will be referred to the Graduate Council.

(3) If the proposal is approved by the Graduate Council, the statement submitted under (2) above will constitute the student's program of study. Request for changes must be submitted to the Graduate dean.

(4) The student's Advisory Committee will designate one of its members to be the major professor who will supervise the student in the program and chair the committee. The major field usually will be in the department of the major professor and must be an area in which the University is authorized to award the master's degree.

(5) The degree designation will reflect the program, and the transcript will reflect the student's major field (e.g., Microbiology and Immunology or Pharmaceutical Sciences).
(6) The Advisory Committee will be responsible for administering the comprehensive examination and approving the thesis, if the thesis option is chosen.

3.5 GENERAL MASTER'S DEGREE REQUIREMENTS

3.5.1 Transfer Credit for Master's Degrees
The acceptance of transfer credit from another institution for a master's degree at OUHSC is determined in accordance with the following criteria:
(1) A maximum of 25 % of the minimum number of credit hours required for the master's degree may be transferred from other institutions. Eight transfer hours may be accepted in a 30-hour program.

(2) An exception to the 25 % limit on transfer credit is made for courses taken from an accredited institution taken through electronic media approved in advance by the department and Graduate College. Residence credit is granted for graduate level coursework taken via electronic media when taught by a member of the University of Oklahoma graduate faculty. A student working toward a graduate degree may be permitted to apply credit earned from other accredited institutions via electronic media in an amount not to exceed 50 % of his/her total degree program. In no instance can the total number of credit hours transferred including electronic media, exceed 50 % of the degree program.

(3) The coursework transferred must represent valid graduate credit earned in graduate level courses from an accredited college or university. Credit earned by advanced standing will not apply to ward a graduate degree.

(4) The credit must carry a grade of A, B, or S.

(5) The credit must be applicable to the degree program.

(6) The transfer credit must not be more than six years old at the time of admission to the degree program. In special cases, credit more than six years old may be transferred if recommended and validated by the department and approved by the Graduate dean. The departmental procedures to validate the student's current knowledge and competency must have the approval of the Graduate dean.

(7) Credit from a professional degree program such as the M.D., D.D.S. or D.V.M. may be applied toward a graduate degree as transfer credit, provided that such courses carry a grade of A, B, or S and have been approved for graduate credit by the academic institution of origin.

(8) Graduate coursework completed at OU Norman and OU Tulsa is considered residence credit. Upon approval of the department and the Graduate dean, these hours may be used without limitation as credit toward a master's degree.
(9) Credit hours previously presented and counted for one master's degree or certificate may not be applied toward satisfying the requirements of a second master's degree or certificate with the exception of approved dual degree programs.
(10) All transfer coursework must be approved by the department and the Graduate dean. Departments with transfer rules more stringent than those listed in this section shall take precedence and will be listed in the departmental section of this bulletin.

(11) Transfer credit is considered neutral in computing the University of Oklahoma grade point average for the purpose of determining academic status, probation, and graduation.

3.5.2 Time Limits for Completing Master's Degrees
A student registered in a master's degree program typically will complete work within six calendar years after the student's first graduate enrollment at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center. Departments with shorter time limits have so indicated in the section of this bulletin that refers specifically to their program.

When additional time is necessary and appropriate, the student and advisor will petition the student's department for an extension. The extension may be denied, in which case the student will be dismissed, or it may be granted with qualification. The department must inform the student, advisor, and Graduate dean of its decision in writing. If the extension exceeds one year, approval by the Graduate dean is required. Extensions needing approval by the Graduate dean will require that the department or program unit certify that the student's knowledge will be current and appropriate to the degree at the time the degree is awarded.

Graduate credit taken at the University of Oklahoma or at another accredited university that is to be applied toward a master's degree must not be more than six years old at the time of admission or readmission to the Graduate College. No more than one-quarter of the credit hours (transfer credit and residence credit) applied toward a master's degree can be more than six years old at the time of graduation.
A student's registration in a master's degree program is terminated upon receiving the degree. To continue studies in the Graduate College, re-application in another graduate degree program or as an unclassified student must be made and approved.

3.5.3 Outline of Graduate Work
Students are required to file an Outline of Graduate Work within the first year of graduate study. This form available from the Graduate College website at http://www.ouhsc.edu/graduate/Student_Forms.htm , serves as the student's guideline for courses needed to complete degree requirements. Once filed, any changes in the Outline of Graduate Work must be explained and documented in writing and consistent with the Admissions to Candidacy form.

3.5.4 Admission to Candidacy
Students who are doing satisfactory graduate work may normally be admitted to candidacy for a degree as soon as they have enrolled in sufficient hours for the degree. The Admission to Candidacy form available from the Graduate College website at http://www.ouhsc.edu/graduate/Student_Forms.htm should be filed with the Graduate College at the beginning of the semester in which the student expects to graduate. (Consult the academic calendar for the specific deadline.) Also, at the time the Admission to Candidacy is filed with the Graduate College students should obtain instructions governing the completion of coursework, graduation and thesis preparation, if applicable.

3.5.5 Selection of the Thesis Committee and Topic
A master's thesis is the product of the candidate's research endeavor. It should be original in the field and must be original for the student. A student writing a thesis should choose a topic and a thesis committee consistent with procedures established by the sponsoring department. The committee must consist of a major professor and at least two other graduate faculty members as approved by the Graduate dean. It is the responsibility of the student to ensure that approval, if appropriate, has been granted from all regulatory offices, i.e., Institutional Review Board for use of human subjects, Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee for use of animals, etc.

3.5.6 Continuous Enrollment Requirements for 5980
Initial enrollment in 5980, Research for Master's Thesis, must be for at least two hours. Subsequently, each graduate student must maintain continuous enrollment during each semester in at least two hours of 5980 until the requirements for the degree are completed or candidacy for the degree is terminated. Enrollment in 5980 during the summer session is required if work is being done on the thesis.

The continuous enrollment requirement will be waived for a student who is not working on the thesis but enrolled in full-time coursework. However, if thesis work is being done, a student must enroll in 5980 regardless of the number of other hours of enrollment. Exceptions to the continuous enrollment requirement will be considered on an individual basis by petition to the Graduate dean.

The faculty advisor will determine the number of 5980 credit hours for each enrollment on the basis of the amount of faculty and University services and resources required by the individual student, but each enrollment will be for two or more hours. A student working full time on the thesis and using University facilities should be enrolled as a full-time student during regular semesters and the summer session. See the Enrollment section in this bulletin for information on full-time enrollment requirements. Such enrollments must be completed during the regular registration period.
An enrollment of less than full time requires the signature of the student's major department chairperson as well as the faculty advisor.

A graduate student who does not comply or has not complied with the enrollment provisions above must enroll during the semester in which graduation is expected in the exact number of hours of 5980 that would have been completed under continuous enrollment. In addition, a late enrollment fee must be paid for each of those semesters. The Graduate College and the Office of Admissions and Records shall determine the number of hours of 5980 in which the student must enroll during the final semester of the degree program.

3.5.7 Thesis Reading Copy
The master's candidate should prepare and distribute reading copies of the thesis to each committee member. The reading copy should be in an acceptable format and must include all figures and tables, numbered pages and a complete bibliography. It is the responsibility of the candidate to ensure the thesis format complies with the Graduate College standards as defined in the "Guidelines For the Preparation of the Masterís Thesis and Doctoral DissertationĒ found online at http://graduate.ouhsc.edu/currentstudents/documents/DissertationThesisPublishedMaterialPermission.pdf.

When the reading copy has received preliminary approval of the major professor, it should be submitted to the Graduate College along with a memorandum from the major professor indicating approval of the reading copy and listing the members of the reading committee. If a tentative defense date has been scheduled, it may be indicated in the memorandum from the major professor. Reading copy deadlines are printed on the Academic Calendar for each semester found on the Admissions and Records website at http://www.admissions.ouhsc.edu/

Students who wish to file an electronic thesis must submit their reading copy as a PDF document using Adobe Acrobat. Approval to submit in this format must be indicated by the major professor in a memorandum. The committee will read and determine whether the thesis demonstrates the student's discipline. They may accept or reject it. If rejected, the student will be given another opportunity to submit an acceptable thesis to the committee and the Graduate College. If they accept it, they may require changes and corrections.

When the thesis is acceptable and a degree check indicates the student has completed all course work with acceptable grades, the student may schedule the final oral defense.

3.5.8 Defense of the Thesis
At least 10 working days prior to the defense of the thesis, the chair of the student's committee must send a memorandum including a list of all committee members, the date of the defense, and a Request for the Authority form to the Graduate College found online at http://graduate.ouhsc.edu/currentstudents/graduate-student-forms.html.

The defense may be oral, written, or a combination of oral and written. It may be restricted to the defense of the thesis and/or cover the coursework required for the degree. Within 72 hours after the thesis defense, the authority form must be returned to the Graduate College with the results and signatures of all committee members. A unanimous vote concerning the candidate's performance in defending the thesis is expected; however, some dissenting votes may be cast. If one member dissents, a minority report must be filed with the Graduate dean. If the committee consists of three members of who two dissent, the performance is graded as unsatisfactory. If the committee consists of more than three members and two dissents, a minority report must be filed and the Graduate dean will investigate. The Dean's decision will be final. If more than two members cast an unsatisfactory vote, the defense is to be graded unsatisfactory.

Only one attempt is afforded the candidate in defending the thesis. If the defense is graded unsatisfactory, this decision is final and the defense cannot be repeated. Courses taken prior to failing the thesis defense can count for no more than 25 % of the credit hours required for a master's degree at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center. These courses must be applied to an academic program other than the one in which the student failed the defense. The student must gain admission to a different program and have the permission from that department and the Dean of the Graduate College to include any courses used for the previous graduate program.


3.5.9 Time Limit for Depositing Thesis in the Library
Students must submit their thesis in electronic format to the Graduate College.  Two CDs (each containing the thesis in PDF format) and a paper copy of the thesis signature page containing original signatures of the thesis committee or an electronic version of the thesis signature page containing digital signatures of the thesis committee must be submitted to the Graduate College.  After approval by the Graduate College, the CDs containing the thesis in PDF format are given to the student to be deposited with the library.

The thesis must be delivered to the Graduate College within 60 calendar days of the final defense.  Students planning to graduate in a particular semester must meet specific academic deadlines and may not have 60 calendar days available. University graduate deadlines are listed in the OUHSC Academic calendar.   See Graduation Deadlines Section 4.11.

Failure to submit the final copy within 60 days will cause the results of the defense to be set aside, whereupon the student must offer the Graduate College a new reading copy of the thesis that carries preliminary approval of the major professor. When the committee has accepted this new reading copy, the student may schedule the defense of the thesis, according to the policies and procedures defined above.

It is essential that all thesis candidates make themselves responsible for the complete and accurate collation of their materials before turning them in to the Graduate College.  If utilizing copyrighted material in the thesis, students must obtain permission from the holder of the copyright for such reproduction; without permission, the author of the thesis is liable to prosecution once the thesis has been made a published document.  The student must complete and submit the form “Permission to use Published Material in Dissertation/Thesis” available on the Graduate College website under Current Students/Graduate Student Forms.

3.5.10 Comprehensive Examination For Non-Thesis Master's Students
A comprehensive examination is required of all non-thesis degree candidates seeking a Master of Science degree. At the option of the department, the examination may be written, oral, or a combination of written and oral. Authority to take the Comprehensive Examination must be requested from the Graduate College. The chairperson of the committee must send a memorandum requesting Authority to administer the Comprehensive Examination at least 10 working days prior to the scheduled examination. The Request for the Masterís Comprehensive Examination is found online at http://www.ouhsc.edu/graduate/Student_Forms.htm. The form must list the examination committee consisting of at least three members of the Graduate Faculty and the requested time and location of the examination.

The examination may be individualized to the student's coursework/program of study or may be a standardized examination for all students in the program. The examination should be scheduled during the semester of the student's final enrollment in coursework. The Authority for the Comprehensive Examination form will be issued if the student has filed an Admission to Candidacy form, is in good academic standing and enrolled in at least two graduate credit hours during the semester the examination is to be taken. All degree requirements are expected to be completed the semester the Comprehensive Examination is administered. Degree completion more than one semester following the Comprehensive Examination may require a second Examination.

Within 72 hours after the examination is complete, the authority form must be returned to the Graduate College with the results and signatures of all committee members. If the comprehensive examination is failed, a report must be submitted to the Graduate College indicating whether the student may repeat the examination. This report must also outline the student's deficiencies. A student who fails a second time will no longer be eligible for a master's degree in the academic program, in which the examination was failed.

Courses taken prior to failing the comprehensive examination for a second time can count for no more than 25 % of the credit hours required for a master's degree at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center.


3.6 GRADUATION DEADLINES

The date of graduation for each term shall be the last day of final examination in the fall, the date of commencement in the spring, and the last day of classes in the summer.  To entitle a student to graduate as of that date, all work required for the degree (this includes the depositing the thesis/dissertation in the library and payment of tuition and fees) must be completed prior to the first day of classes of the next semester or summer session.   If the student has not completed all the requirements, the student will become a graduate the following semester.   It is the student's responsibility to make sure all degree requirements have been met.

The following deadlines apply:

        1.      Current Semester Graduate:  All documents (including dissertation final copy) must be to the Graduate College office by 5 PM on the last working day prior to the beginning of the upcoming semester.

   

        2.      Upcoming Semester Graduate Without Enrollment:  All documents (including dissertation final copy) must be to the Graduate College office by 5 PM on the last working day to enroll for the upcoming semester.

        3.      Upcoming Semester With Required Enrollment:  Monday after the final day to add a class, the student must become a graduate of the upcoming semester and must enroll in 2 hours of 5980.  

 

3.7 DIPLOMA AND FEES
During the candidate's last semester, the candidate must file an official Application for Graduation, pay a graduation fee, and pay all tuition and fee charges before the degree will be conferred and a diploma issued. The student who plans to participate in the commencement ceremony must pay a cap and gown rental fee.

3.8 CHECKLIST FOR THESIS MASTER'S DEGREE is found at
http://graduate.ouhsc.edu/currentstudents/documents/MasterThesisTimeline_12.pdf

3.9 CHECKLIST FOR NON-THESIS MASTER'S DEGREE is found at http://graduate.ouhsc.edu/currentstudents/documents/MasterTimelineNon-Thesis07.pdf


Doctoral Degree Programs

4.1 DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY DEGREE (PhD)
The Graduate College awards the doctoral degree for excellence in research and scholarship, not merely because the student completes a program of courses or spends a given time in its pursuit. The doctorate signifies the attainment of independently acquired and comprehensive knowledge and attests to the general professional competence of the recipient. The Graduate College of the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center normally grants a doctoral degree only to individuals who do not already hold a PhD or similar graduate degree.

A student should expect to spend a minimum of four full academic years beyond the bachelor's degree. During this period the student shall take adequate course work, successfully complete the general examination, and successfully defend the results of original research presented in a dissertation.

The minimum required number of semester hours for the doctoral degree, combining both formal courses and hours of research is 90 post-baccalaureate hours. Up to 6 hours of 5980, Research for the Master's Thesis, may be included in the 90 hours. Credits accumulated to satisfy research tool requirements will not be accepted in fulfillment of the 90-hour minimum requirement.

After admission to the Graduate College, students become prospective candidates at the discretion of their Advisory Conference Committee. Full candidacy is granted only upon successful completion of the General Examination.

Students who finish a master's degree cannot continue graduate study unless they are admitted into a doctoral program by the recommendation of a department and approval of the Graduate dean.

4.2 ACCELERATED DUAL DEGREE PROGRAM
The accelerated dual degree program establishes a framework of rules by which academic units may offer students the option of earning a combined bachelor's and graduate degree in an accelerated program. The program allows students with 30 hours of advanced standing credit to earn both the bachelor's and the master's degrees within three to four years of matriculation and the bachelor's and Ph.D. degrees in as short a period as five years from matriculation. Interested applicants should contact the academic programs of interest to design a degree plan.

4.3 SPECIALIZATION IN NEUROSCIENCE
Neuroscience by its very nature is an interdisciplinary, collaborative area encompassing many different disciplines including cell biology, physiology, biochemistry and pathology, as well as, clinical neuroscience. Students may elect to receive a doctoral degree in neuroscience or a specialization in neuroscience. To receive a specialization in neuroscience, a student must be admitted to a degree- granting department at the Health Sciences Center or Norman campus. Students who complete the neuroscience specialization requirements will receive a designation of "Specialization of Neuroscience" upon completion of the Ph.D. degree.

4.4 M.D./Ph.D. DEGREE PROGRAM
Applicants wishing to combine studies for the M.D. and Ph.D. degrees must be accepted into the M.D. degree program and into a doctoral degree program. This is a combined degree program between the College of Medicine and Graduate College. Students accepted into the program complete the first two years of medical school, enter a graduate program completing a Doctor of Philosophy degree, then complete the last two years of medical school.


4.5 INTERDISCIPLINARY DOCTORAL PROGRAM
A nontraditional program may be selected by students who do not choose to specialize in one of the prescribed program areas. The authority for designing and awarding an interdisciplinary doctoral degree is vested with the Graduate Council. This does not imply the relaxation of standards and levels of performance. It frees the candidate from the need to satisfy specific degree requirements of a department or unit which may not be particularly relevant to the program of study desired by the candidate. This determination is made by an Advisory Committee and the Graduate Council.
Because regular departmental programs usually require some course work in related areas, these programs must be defined so that they differ from conventional departmental programs. To this end, an interdisciplinary program is defined as one in which the candidate takes less than the normal number of courses required for a doctoral student in the disciplinary program but may require more didactic coursework than for the traditional doctoral degree. The procedures for candidacy and for earning a doctoral degree in an Interdisciplinary program are:

(1) The candidate must apply and be admitted to a graduate program authorized by the State Regents to grant the doctoral degree. Admission to the graduate program does not necessarily imply subsequent acceptance into an interdisciplinary program.

(2) To be admitted into the Interdisciplinary program, the candidate must submit a petition to the Graduate Dean consisting of: a statement justifying the need for investigation in the proposed area; a list of courses to be included in the program of study; how this program significantly differs from existing programs; a research proposal; and a statement about the program from the proposed members of the Advisory Committee.

(3) The Graduate Dean, or a person designated by the Dean, is an ex-officio member of the Interdisciplinary Advisory Committee. The Graduate Council must approve the rationale, courses, and members of the Advisory Committee. The Graduate Council may require the student and the studentís mentor attend a Graduate Council meeting and defend the program of study. Any changes in an approved program must be authorized by the Graduate Dean.

(4) The majority of the graduate's courses leading to the Interdisciplinary degree must be taken in departments or units authorized to offer the doctoral degree. Credit received for research for the doctoral dissertation may not be used to meet the preceding requirements.

(5) For the Interdisciplinary program, the degree granted will bear the name of the program in which most of the candidate's courses are taken, for example, Physiology/ Interdisciplinary.

(6) Subsequent procedures follow the rules of the Graduate College, except that the Advisory Committee is not constrained to follow the specific degree requirements of a particular department or unit.

4.6 GENERAL DOCTORAL DEGREE REQUIREMENTS

4.6.1 Transfer Credit for Doctoral Programs
The acceptance of transfer credit from another institution for a doctoral degree at OUHSC is determined in accordance with the following criteria:

(1) A maximum of 44 semester hours from individual courses and/or a completed degree may be applied toward a doctoral degree. Exceptions can be made for additional non-OU coursework taken by electronic media, following enrollment in an OUHSC doctoral program.

(2) The coursework transferred must represent valid graduate credit earned in graduate level courses from an accredited college or university.

(3) The credit must carry a grade of A, B, or S.

(4) The credit must be applicable to the degree program.

(5) Individual courses applied must not be more than six years old at the time of admission to the degree program. In special cases, credit more than six years old may be transferred if recommended and validated by the department and approved by the Graduate dean. The departmental procedures to validate the student's current knowledge and competency must have the approval of the Graduate dean.

(6) A completed master's degree, all of which is to be used, may be applied toward a doctoral degree regardless of age, if approved by the department/program and the Graduate dean. The total number of credit hours transferred toward the Ph.D. degree cannot exceed 44 semester hours.

(7) Credit from a professional degree program such as the M.D., D.D.S., or D.V.M. degree may be applied toward a graduate degree as transfer credit, provided that such courses carry a grade of A, B, or S and have been approved for graduate credit by the academic institution of origin.

(8) Graduate coursework completed while a student in a doctoral degree program at the University of Oklahoma Norman or OU Tulsa Campuses will be considered as residence credit, and upon approval of the department and the Graduate dean, may be used without limitation as credit toward a doctoral degree.

(9) Credit hours previously counted for one doctoral degree may not be applied toward a second doctoral degree. No more than six hours of transfer thesis research credit from a completed master's degree may be applied toward a doctoral degree.

(10) Credit by correspondence or by advanced standing examination will not apply toward a graduate degree.

(11) Graduate coursework taken in Tulsa from the University of Oklahoma is not considered transfer credit. OSU Tulsa consists of five cooperating universities that provide undergraduate and graduate level courses as well as some degree programs. Credit taken from the other cooperating universities through OSU Tulsa is considered transfer work and must comply with the transfer policies.

(12) All transfer coursework must be approved by the department and by the Graduate dean. Departments with transfer rules more stringent than those listed in this section have specified them in the departmental section of the bulletin. These more stringent rules take precedence over the general rules described in this section.

Procedures for application of transfer credit may be found at http://www.ouhsc.edu/graduate/PDF/TransferHoursintoDoctoralProgram.pdf

4.6.2 Grade Point Average Computation
Transfer credit is considered neutral in computing the University of Oklahoma grade point average for the purpose of determining academic status, probation, and graduation.

4.6.3 Time Limits For Completing Doctoral Degree
A doctoral student who enters the OUHSC Graduate College with a bachelor's degree is expected to pass the departmental general examination within five calendar years of the student's first graduate enrollment in the department and a student who enters with a master's degree is expected to pass the departmental general examination within four calendar years of the student's first graduate enrollment in the department.

A doctoral candidate is normally expected to complete all the degree requirements within five years after admission to candidacy. Departments with shorter time limits have so indicated in the section of this Bulletin that refers specifically to their program. Extensions greater than one year need the approval of the Graduate dean and will require that the department or program unit involved certify that the student's knowledge will be current and appropriate to the degree at the time the degree is awarded. The procedure to be used for this determination must be approved by the Graduate dean.

Individual graduate courses, not applied toward a previous graduate degree, taken at the University of Oklahoma or at another accredited university that is to be applied toward a doctoral degree must not be more than six years old at the time of admission or readmission to the Graduate College. No more than 23 credit hours (transfer credit and resident credit) applied toward a doctoral degree can be more than nine years old at the time of graduation for students entering with a master's degree or ten years old for students entering with a bachelor's degree.

4.6.4 Responsibilities of the Graduate Department or Academic Unit

Each department or academic unit offering the doctoral degree is responsible for its graduate program. The department determines how its program shall function and how it shall exercise the powers delegated to it. These determinations shall include how many hours of course work constitute a minimum for the degree, what proportion of the work toward the degree is to be devoted to research, and the role of the dissertation. Further, each department or unit shall make its own rules regarding the time its students may spend, or work they may do, other than toward the degree itself, in classroom, laboratory, research assistance, or instruction.

Research proficiency is based in part on the development of attitudes and skills, which vary considerably from one field to another. The faculty for each program is responsible for requiring that their doctoral candidates demonstrate proficiency in those skills deemed necessary for successful research performance. For example, a faculty may require its students to demonstrate the ability to read, write, or speak one or more foreign languages; to employ statistics in analyzing data; or demonstrate computer competence.

Each department or unit of the University offering the doctoral degree will decide the time and means of certifying prospective candidacy and will formally notify the Graduate College when a student has completed all the requirements to be nominated as a prospective candidate. The Graduate dean will admit the student to candidacy.

4.6.5 Terminal Master's Degree
Effective for students entering doctoral programs in fall 2009, a doctoral student who has successfully passed the General Examination may request to change their major to a terminal masterís degree. Matriculated doctoral students changing to a terminal masterís degree must complete the requirements for a thesis masterís degree to be awarded a masterís degree as described in the Masters Programs portion of the Graduate College Bulletin. Students changing to a terminal masterís degree may not enter the same doctoral program at a later date.

4.7 THE ADVISORY COMMITTEE
Each department or program unit will establish a Departmental Advisory Committee in such a way that the related areas within the department are represented.  A minimum of three Graduate Faculty members should comprise the Advisory Committee with the majority authorized to chair a doctoral committee.  The membership of the committee must be approved by the Graduate dean.

The responsibilities of this committee will be to:

(a) Advise, encourage, and act as an advocate for students from the first day a student is in the program. This should include regularly scheduled meetings with the student through the completion of the general examination and until the dissertation advisor is selected;
(b)Design an appropriate curriculum for each student;
(c) Work with the student to complete and file with the Graduate College a plan of study (Report of the Doctoral Advisory Conference). This report should be filed no later than the end of the student's first year in the program. The Committee should be sure that the student understands that the program may need to be modified or additional work may be necessary, depending on the choice of the dissertation advisor and dissertation topic;
(d) Coordinate the administration of the General Examination at the appropriate time;
(e) Perform an annual evaluation of each student's progress toward the degree and communicate the results of the evaluation to the student and the Graduate dean; and
(f) Help the students select an appropriate dissertation advisor.

4.8 THE GENERAL EXAMINATION

Students should apply for the General Examination when the course work and any tools of research as described in the Report of the Doctoral Advisory Conference are almost complete. The examination is intended to test the student's mastery of a number of related fields as well as the student's ability to synthesize, integrate, generalize, and expand upon all knowledge gained prior to the examination. Students should expect that material included in this examination will go beyond the subject matter covered in any individual course.

Each graduate program will develop clearly defined guidelines for the General Examination including:

 

(a) When the examination will be administered within the student's outlined program;
(b) The structure and format for the examination (must include a written portion);
(c) The procedure for evaluating the examination; and
(d) The procedure available for students to receive consultation and evaluation of their performance on the examination.

These guidelines must be approved by the Graduate College and any changes to the guidelines for the General Examination must be submitted to and approved by the Graduate Dean.

The student submits to the Graduate College the Application for the General Examination at least 10 working days prior to the start of the examination.  (The application is available online from the Graduate College website under Current Students\Graduate Student Forms.)

The application must contain the names and signatures of the student’s General Examination Committee.  The General Examination Committee must be composed of five Graduate Faculty members with the majority authorized to chair a doctoral committee. The application must be approved by the student’s graduate program as documented by the signature of the graduate liaison.

Upon submission to the Graduate College the application must be approved by the Graduate Dean.  The student may not begin the General Examination until their graduate program receives notification that the Graduate Dean has approved their Application for the General Examination.  Any General Examination taken without approval of the Graduate College must be repeated.

Advances in electronic media have made it possible for the oral component of the General Exam to be held without the presence of every member at the same location. The Graduate College must be notified of remote participation before the oral component. The student, the committee chair, and the majority of General Examination Committee must be physically present at the same location for the oral component of the General Examination.  Other committee members may participate remotely via audio or video conference.

Within 72 hours following completion of the General Examination, the chair of the General Examination Committee must submit to the Graduate College a written report signed by all members of the examination committee indicating  whether the student passed or failed the examination.  Copies of electronic signatures for committee members who have been approved to participate remotely will be accepted.

A unanimous report from the General Examination Committee is expected; however, on occasion committee members may dissent. If one committee member dissents the dissent is recorded.  If two committee members dissent the dissent is recorded, a minority report must be filed, and the Graduate Dean will investigate and make the final decision on the General Examination. If more than two committee members dissent, the General Examination is judged to be a failure.

Upon notification that the student has successfully passed their General Examination and a request has been made to the Graduate Dean for admission to candidacy, the student is eligible to enroll in dissertation research hours (6980).  The student must be eligible for candidacy by the final date to enroll in order to enroll in dissertation research hours (6980) for that semester.

   

If a student fails either the written or oral portion of the General Examination the examination is considered a failure. Students have the option of taking a second Generation Examination if they fail the first attempt.  The Chair of the General Examination Committee must provide the student with a critique of the failed exam; describe any further coursework, reading, etc. that the student is required to do prior to taking the second examination; and the proposed time for completion of the second General Examination.  This must be provided as a written document to the student and a copy provided to the Graduate College Dean within 7 working days of the failed General Examination.

To take a second General Examination the student must submit a new Application for the General Examination to the Graduate College following the above procedures.  The second General Examination must be scheduled no later than one academic year after failure of the first exam.  Failure of the General Examination for a second time will result in dismissal from the doctoral program.

4.8.1 Earning a Masterís Degree While Enrolled in a Doctoral Program
Policy after Successful Completion of the General Exam:
When permitted by departmental policy, effective for students entering doctoral programs in fall 2009, students who do not hold the master's degree in the doctoral discipline may apply for the master's degree if they have passed the General Examination for the doctoral degree, have met the departmental requirements for the masterís degree, and have the recommendation of the major department. Upon approval by the Graduate dean, the student will be awarded the appropriate master's degree.

Students in graduate programs that do not offer a non-thesis masterís degree must complete the requirements for a thesis masterís degree to be awarded a masterís degree; materials presented in the masterís thesis may not be included in the studentís doctoral dissertation. For students in graduate programs that do offer a non-thesis masterís degree the program may stipulate whether or not a doctoral student who meets the above requirements may request a non-thesis masterís degree or be required to complete the thesis masterís requirements. The request to obtain a masterís degree must be made no later than the next semester after passing the General Examination. The student must file an Admission to Candidacy form for the master's degree and pay the appropriate graduation fees. Transfer credit can only be applied once to a succeeding degree.

Policy After Failure of the General Exam:
Effective for student entering doctoral programs in fall 2009, students who have failed the general examination and do not hold the master's degree in the doctoral discipline may request to change their major to the masterís degree program. Students in graduate programs that do not offer a non-thesis masterís degree must complete the requirements for a thesis masterís degree to be awarded a masterís degree. For students in graduate programs that do offer a non-thesis masterís degree the program may stipulate whether or not the student may request a non-thesis masterís degree or be required to complete the thesis masterís requirements.

If the program will allow the student to receive a non-thesis masterís degree, the student may apply to take the master's comprehensive examination if they have otherwise met all of the departmental requirements for the master's degree, and have the recommendation of the major department. Courses taken prior to failing the general examination for the second time may count for no more than 50 % of the credit hours required for a master's degree in a different discipline at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center. Furthermore, the courses must have been taken within six years of the student's admission to the master's degree being sought. The student must be admitted to the master's degree program and have permission from that department and the Graduate dean to include the courses.

Enrollment Requirements During General Examination
A student must be enrolled for credit in at least two graduate credit hours at the University of Oklahoma in the semester the General Examination is held.

4.9 THE DOCTORAL COMMITTEE
The student's Doctoral Committee will be established by the Advisory Committee in coordination with the student and the dissertation advisor and with approval by the Graduate dean. This committee will consist of at least five members with the majority from the department and with at least one member from outside the department. The committee must be constituted so that no more than two members do not have authority to chair doctoral committees.†† If the Graduate Faculty appointment level of a doctoral committee member changes, the Graduate College will honor the appointment level at the time the committee was approved. 

This committee must be appointed no later than the time that the General Examination is successfully completed. Any changes in the membership of the Doctoral Committee must be done in consultation with the student and approved by the remaining members of the Committee and the Graduate dean. The Graduate dean may exercise the prerogative of appointing an additional voting representative of the Graduate College. If the representative is appointed later than one semester prior to the time of the General Examination, he or she will serve as a non-voting member of the Committee.

The functions of this committee will be to:

(a) Guide the student in the selection of an appropriate dissertation topic and in the research design and methodology for the dissertation;
(b) Approve the student's research plan or prospectus;
(c) Advise and assist the student with specialty information necessary to design and complete the dissertation research project;
(d) Perform an annual evaluation of the student's progress toward the degree and communicate the results of the evaluation to the student and the Graduate dean;
(e) Read and correct the drafts of the dissertation to insure that appropriate standards are met; and,
(f) Administer the dissertation defense.

This Request for Approval of Doctoral Committee form is available on the Graduate College website at http://graduate.ouhsc.edu/currentstudents/documents/Request_approval_doctoral_committee_2.pdf .

4.10 THE DOCTORAL DISSERTATION
The doctoral dissertation is the final and most important component of the series of academic experiences, which culminates in the awarding of the doctoral degree. Three major functions are fulfilled by the dissertation experience: (1) it is a work of original research/scholarship that makes a contribution to existing knowledge; (2) it demonstrates the candidate's mastery of research methods and tools of the special field; and (3) it demonstrates the student's ability to address a significant intellectual problem and to arrive at a successful conclusion.

Aided by the dissertation advisor, the student should promptly select a dissertation topic. It is the responsibility of the student to ensure that approval, if appropriate, has been granted from all regulatory offices, i.e., IRB, IACUC, etc. After the General Examination, most of the student's time will be devoted to research and writing the dissertation. The student must enroll in enough hours of Research for Doctor's Dissertation (course 6980) to satisfy the requirement of the major department and to meet the minimum 90-hour requirement of the Graduate College.

Thesis/Dissertation guidelines are found on the Graduate College website at This form available from the Graduate College website at http://graduate.ouhsc.edu/currentstudents/documents/DissertationThesisPublishedMaterialPermission.pdf

4.10.1 Requirements for Enrolling in Dissertation Research
The initial enrollment in 6980 (Research for Doctoral Dissertation) must be for at least two hours and only students who have completed the General Examination and have been admitted to candidacy by the final date to enroll for the upcoming semester  may enroll in 6980..

4.10.2 Dissertation Reading Copy
The doctoral candidate should prepare and distribute reading copies of the dissertation to each doctoral committee member. The reading copy should be in an acceptable dissertation format and must include all figures and tables, numbered pages, and a complete bibliography.

It is the responsibility of the student to assure that the dissertation format complies with the Graduate College standards as defined in the "Guidelines for the Preparation of the Master's Thesis and Doctoral Dissertation." When the copy has received preliminary approval of the major professor, it should be submitted to the Graduate College along with a memorandum from the major professor indicating approval of the reading copy and listing the members of the reading committee. Reading copy deadlines are printed in the Academic Calendar for each semester. Students who wish to file an electronic dissertation must submit their reading copy as a PDF document using Adobe Acrobat (4.0). Approval to submit in this format must be indicated by the major professor in a memorandum.

The Graduate dean will direct the committee to read and determine whether the dissertation demonstrates the student's discipline. They may accept or reject it. If they reject it, the student will be given another opportunity to submit an acceptable dissertation to the committee and the Graduate College. If they accept it, they may require changes and corrections. When the dissertation is in an acceptable format to the Graduate College and a degree check indicates the student has completed all course work with acceptable grades, the student may schedule the final oral examination.

4.10.3 Final Oral Examination-Dissertation Defense

The final oral examination is a defense of the dissertation and is open to the public. The student must be enrolled in at least two hours the semester he/she is to take the final oral examination.  Any changes in the doctoral committee must be approved by the Graduate dean.   The Graduate dean may exercise a prerogative and appoint an observer for the Graduate College who would not be a voting member.

At least 10 days before the defense, the candidate must submit to the Graduate College an Announcement for the Final Exam and a double-spaced abstract of no more than 350 words. The Dissertation Defense Announcement form is located on the Graduate College website at under Current Students\Graduate Student Forms.  Authority for the Defense of the Doctoral Dissertation and other forms are mailed to the student's major professor before the final oral exam.  All members of the committee must sign the form and signify whether the examination was satisfactory or unsatisfactory.  

Advances in electronic media have made it possible for the oral defense to be held without the presence of every member at the same location. The Graduate College must be notified of remote participation in advance of the defense. The student, the committee chair, and the majority of dissertation committee must be physically present at the same location.  Other committee members may participate remotely via audio or video conference.

Copies of electronic signatures for committee members who have been approved to participate remotely will be accepted on the Authority Report Form for the Dissertation Defense.  Original signatures from all members are required on the final written dissertation signature page.

The results of the dissertation defense must be reported to the Graduate College within 72 hours. A unanimous report from the doctoral committee is expected; however, on occasion some dissenting reports are received.  If one member dissents, the dissent is recognized as a minority report.  If two members of the doctoral committee dissent, a minority report must be filed and the Graduate dean will investigate and make the final decision.  If more than two members vote unsatisfactory, the defense is judged to be a failure. Only one attempt is granted in defending the dissertation. If the defense is determined to be unsatisfactory (failure), the decision is final and the defense cannot be repeated. Furthermore, the student will be dropped from the rolls of the Graduate College and candidacy for the doctoral degree will terminate.

Nothing herein shall prohibit such a student from reapplying for admission to the Graduate College and pursuing a doctoral degree in another major field so long as the student satisfies all necessary degree requirements under the rules and regulations of the admitting department, Graduate College and University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center.

4.10.4 Depositing a Dissertation in the Library

Students must submit their dissertation in electronic format to the Graduate College. Two CDs (each containing the dissertation in PDF format) and a paper copy of the dissertation signature page containing original signatures of the dissertation committee or an electronic version of the dissertation signature page containing digital signatures of the dissertation committee must be submitted to the Graduate College.  All Dissertation Committee members must sign the signature page or submit a written dissent to the Graduate College.  The written dissent must be submitted at the time of the final signed written dissertation to the Graduate College.

After approval by the Graduate College, the CDs containing the dissertation in PDF format are given to the student to be deposited with the library.

The final copy of the dissertation must be delivered to the Graduate College within 60 calendar days of the oral defense. Students planning to graduate in a particular semester must meet specific academic deadlines and may not have 60 calendar days available. University graduate deadlines are listed in the OUHSC Academic calendar. See Graduation Deadlines Section 4.11.

Failure to submit the final copy within 60 days will cause the results of the defense to be set aside, whereupon the student must offer the Graduate College a new reading copy of the dissertation that carries preliminary approval of the major professor. When the committee has accepted this new reading copy, the student may schedule the defense of the dissertation, according to the policies and procedures defined above.

It is essential that all dissertation candidates make themselves responsible for the complete and accurate collation of their materials before turning them in to the Graduate College. If utilizing copyrighted material in the dissertation, students must obtain permission from the holder of the copyright for such reproduction; without permission, the author of the dissertation is liable to prosecution once the dissertation has been made a published document. The student and mentor must sign and submit the form “Permission to use Published Material in Dissertation/Thesis” available on the Graduate College website under Current Students/Graduate Student Forms.

4.11 GRADUATION DEADLINES

The date of graduation for each term shall be the last day of final examination in the fall, the date of commencement in the spring, and the last day of classes in the summer.  To entitle a student to graduate as of that date, all work required for the degree (this includes the depositing the thesis/dissertation in the library and payment of tuition and fees) must be completed prior to the first day of classes of the next semester or summer session.   If the student has not completed all the requirements, the student will become a graduate the following semester.   It is the student's responsibility to make sure all degree requirements have been met.

The following deadlines apply:

       1.  Current Semester Graduate:  All documents (including dissertation final copy) must be to the Graduate College office by 5 PM on the last working day prior to the beginning of the upcoming semester.   

       2.  Upcoming Semester Graduate Without Enrollment:  All documents (including dissertation final copy) must be to the Graduate College office by 5 PM on the last working day to enroll for the upcoming semester. 

       3.  Upcoming Semester With Required Enrollment:  Monday after the final day to add a class, the student must become a graduate of the upcoming semester and must enroll in 2 hours of 6980.  

 

4.12 DIPLOMA AND FEES
During the candidate's last semester, the candidate must file an official Application for Graduation, pay a graduation fee, and pay all tuition and fee charges before the degree will be conferred and a diploma issued. Doctoral students must also pay a microfilm fee at this time. The student who plans to participate in the commencement ceremony must pay a cap and gown rental fee.

4.13 CHECKLIST FOR DOCTORAL DEGREE is found at
http://graduate.ouhsc.edu/currentstudents/documents/DoctoralDegreeTimelineFINAL_001.pdf


College of Allied Health

Allied Health Sciences
801 NE 13th St.
Oklahoma City, OK 73190
(405) 271- 1444

http://www.ah.ouhsc.edu/ahs/


Kevin Rudeen, Ph.D., Dean and Graduate Liaison, PhD Program

Allen Knehans, Ph.D., David Ross Boyd Professor & Chair

Carol Dionne, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Physical Therapy

Stacy Anderson, M.S., Chair of Medical Dosimetry and Graduate Liaison

5.1 FACULTY ROSTER
For a complete listing of the departmental graduate faculty visit this web site
http://graduate.ouhsc.edu/newfacappt/

5.2 DEGREES OFFERED

Doctor of Philosophy

Master of Science in Medical Dosimetry

5.3 AREAS OF SPECIALIZATION
The Doctor of Philosophy degree program in Allied Health Sciences is interdisciplinary, with areas of specialization in Nutritional Sciences and Rehabilitation Sciences.

A Master of Science degree program with specialization in medical dosimetry is designed for individuals with a baccalaureate degree and certification as a radiation therapist.  Graduates are prepared to practice medical dosimetry and contribute to the health care industry


5.4 PROGRAM OBJECTIVES FOR THE DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY
The Doctor of Philosophy degree program in Allied Health Sciences is interdisciplinary and designed to promote knowledge across disciplines and informed collaboration among disciplines. Graduates of the program will be prepared to assume leadership roles in research, education, public policy, and administration of health care services.

The individualized program is designed to meet each student's educational goals. Graduate courses from any of the departments within the College of Allied Health, the Health Sciences Center campus, or the Norman campus may be selected as a part of a student's individualized program. The interdisciplinary aspects of the program will promote expansion of knowledge across disciplines and informed collaboration among disciplines, which are hallmarks of today's research, education, and health care environments.

5.5 ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY
1. Minimum of a 3.0 grade point average on graded graduate coursework.

2. A master's degree is preferred to pursue the Ph.D. degree, but the master's degree need not be in Allied Health Sciences. Each student's Advisory Committee reserves the right to determine the appropriateness of any graduate work previously completed by a student and may limit transfer credit. A maximum of 34 hours of master's degree work may be applied to the 90 hours required for the Ph.D. degree.

3. Graduate Record Examination General Test.

4. A minimum score of 550 (paper) or 100 (IBT) on the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL), which is administered by Educational Testing Service or the University of Oklahoma, within two years prior to application. This requirement applies to students for whom English is a second language.

5. A completed University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center application, official transcripts from all colleges and/or universities attended and non-refundable application fees. Application deadline is July 1 for fall, December 1 for spring, and May 1 for summer.

6. Name and address of three references each of who are familiar with the applicant's skills, professional accomplishments, and intellectual potential.

7. A career goal statement, which includes a description of how the applicant expects the program to assist in meeting career goals, is required.

8. Prior to the application, a prospective student must contact the Department of Allied Health Sciences to pursue compatibility of the applicant's career goals with our program and the availability of faculty with expertise in the applicant's area of interest.

9. Applications will be processed by the Department of Allied Health Sciences Faculty Admissions Committee. The committee will consider the quality of the career goal statement, the compatibility of the applicant's career goals with those of the program and the availability of faculty with expertise in the applicant's area(s) of interest. It is expected that writing and computer skills of applicants be excellent. The committee may require interviews.

5.6 DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY DEGREE REQUIREMENTS
The Doctor of Philosophy is an advanced degree focusing on in-depth study and research training designed to meet the needs and interests of each student. Ninety hours post-baccalaureate are required.

1.) All students are required to take core interdisciplinary and seminar courses (10 credit hours).

2.) Students must participate in the seminar course four semesters.

3.) There is a 15-18 credit hour requirement for research methods and statistic courses.

4.) There are 11-12 required individualized credit hours in an area of specialization. An individualized program for each student will be identified to meet each studentís goals. Graduate courses from any of the departments within the College of Allied Health, the Health Sciences Center Campus or Norman Campus may be selected. Existing areas of specialization are Rehabilitation Sciences and Nutritional Sciences.


5.) Up to 20 hours can be earned in doing original research for the dissertation under the supervision of faculty from the College of Allied Health.



5.7 CAREER OPPORTUNITIES
Graduates of these programs will be prepared to assume leadership roles in research, education, public policy, and administration of health care services.

Current Courses:† Search AHS prefix courses found online at http://apps.ouhsc.edu/StudentInfo/Courses.aspx?College=AH  


College of Medicine

Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
940 Stanton L. Young Blvd.
Oklahoma City, OK 73190
(405) 271-2227
http://www.oumedicine.com/department-of-biochemistry-and-molecular-biology

Paul Weigel, Ph.D., Chair
Ann Louise Olson, Ph.D., Graduate Program Director and Liaison

6.1 FACULTY ROSTER
For a complete listing of the departmental graduate faculty visit this web site
http://graduate.ouhsc.edu/newfacappt/

6.2 DEGREES OFFERED
Master of Science
Doctor of Philosophy

6.3 AREAS OF SPECIALIZATION
Specific areas include studying the molecular basis of genetic, bacterial, viral and parasitic diseases in projects that include control of gene expression, DNA replication and rearrangement, cell migration, signaling mechanisms, membrane biology and membrane trafficking pathways, structural biology and assembly of macromolecular complexes, and glycobiology.

6.4 PROGRAM OBJECTIVES

Our research-intensive Ph.D. program is designed to prepare students for successful careers as independent scientists in academic research, biotechnology and pharmaceutical industries, health/biomedical science management or teaching.

Our recently redesigned MS program is also research-based, along with coursework designed to provide enhanced education opportunities for students who wish to extend their knowledge, experience, and opportunities for advancement in research laboratories at universities, research institutes or biotechnology companies. The curriculum, separate from that of the PhD program, emphasizes understanding of research procedures as well as development of technical and problem-solving skills.

6.5 ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS
A baccalaureate degree and a 3.0 grade point average are required by the Graduate College. Applicants from foreign institutions whose primary language is not English must submit TOEFL scores.

A science-based undergraduate record including courses in chemistry (general and organic), biochemistry and/or molecular biology is expected.

Applications for the Ph.D. or MS program may be submitted on-line at: http://www.ouhsc.edu/admissions/applyonline.html

Note: When filling out the application, please use Academic Plan Code 0429R or 0429M.

In addition to the Application Form and official transcript submitted to the OUHSC Admissions Office, applicants must send the following to the Department of Biochemistry & Molecular Biology:

(i) a copy of the application

(ii) a copy of all transcripts

(iii) a statement of why you wish to enter the MS program and which faculty laboratory(ies) you would like to work in

(iv) three letters of recommendation from people familiar with your work

(v) GRE scores

(vi) TOEFL scores if English is not your primary language

Applicants for the PhD program of the Department of Biochemistry & Molecular Biology may also apply through the interdisciplinary Graduate Program in Biomedical Sciences (GPiBs) www.oumedicine.com/gpibs , which combines the expertise of six programs at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center: Biochemistry & Molecular Biology, Cell Biology, Microbiology & Immunology, Neuroscience, Pathology, and Physiology. The application procedure is described in the GPiBs section of the Bulletin. An application is filed with the Office of Admissions and is accompanied by official transcripts and results of the Graduate Record Examination (GRE), and TOEFL for foreign applicants. Three letters of recommendation, from individuals who can address the candidateís research potential and suitability for graduate school, are also required. Successful applicants complete the multidisciplinary GPiBS first year curriculum, and enter the Biochemistry & Molecular Biology program in the summer of their first year.

6.6 MASTER OF SCIENCE DEGREE REQUIREMENTS
Students complete at least 30 credit hours of study; 24 credit hours of coursework and at least 6 credit hours of research, under the direction of a faculty mentor, culminating in writing and defending a thesis.

The coursework includes a core biochemistry course, a course on techniques, instrumentation and experimental design, at least one advanced level course, a Current Issues course covering scientific ethics, report writing, regulatory issues, etc, and Journal Clubs. Students obtain practical experience in laboratory modules (5Ė8 weeks each) that will cover at least 5 different areas important in current biomedical research, such as molecular biology and informatics, protein purification and analysis, protein expression, immunology, cell culture and eukaryotic gene expression, and quantitative analysis. More specialized elective rotation topics include glycobiology, cell biology and virology, and biophysical methods such as mass spectrometry, calorimetry, Biacore, fluorescence spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction.

There is flexibility in the program to meet students' interests and aims, and the program for each student will be determined by the Advisory Committee in consultation with the student and mentor.

6.7 DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY DEGREE REQUIREMENTS
PhD students enroll in the common first-year Graduate Program in Biomedical Sciences (GPiBS) curriculum, which includes courses covering molecular, cellular, and systemic biology. Students complete
three laboratory rotations with any of the Biochemistry & Molecular Biology mentoring faculty, and participate in journal club and seminars. Students successfully completing the GPiBs curriculum and choosing a faculty mentor affiliated with Biochemistry & Molecular Biology will complete their research dissertation in the Biochemistry & Molecular Biology program. Students in the M.D./Ph.D. program are also admitted directly into the second year.

A candidate for the Ph.D. degree must complete at least 90 credit hours of academic work, including the first year GPiBS courses. In the fall semester of the second year, Biochemistry & Molecular Biology students enroll in an advanced course on structure and dynamics of macromolecules. Six credit hours of advanced elective courses are also required. All graduate students enroll in Journal Clubs each Fall and Spring semester and participate in all departmental seminars. The remaining hours are Dissertation Research.

The successful completion of a qualifying examination is required for admission to candidacy for the Doctor of Philosophy degree. It is taken after the student's satisfactory completion of the Core Curriculum, in the Spring of the second year. The exam format is for the student to write and orally defend a research proposal. The topic is chosen by the student and is separate from the studentís dissertation research. We view this exercise as a learning tool as well as an examination, and considerable guidance and feedback is given to students on how to prepare a focused, cohesive research proposal. The Graduate College rules for this examination are described elsewhere in this Bulletin, and details of the format are described in the Biochemistry & Molecular Biology handbook.

After passing the general examination the student is admitted to candidacy for the doctoral degree by the Dean of the Graduate College. The student then prepares a prospectus consisting of a description of the research problem, stating overall goals and specific aims, a survey of the relevant literature, and a specific outline of the research plan. The prospectus should be completed and approved by the Doctoral Committee by fall of the third year. A dissertation must be presented and successfully defended. For further information consult the Doctoral section of this bulletin or the Biochemistry and Molecular Biology handbook.

6.8 CAREER OPPORTUNITIES
The MS program of the department of Biochemistry & Molecular Biology has been recently redesigned to provide enhanced education opportunities for students who wish to extend their knowledge, experience, and opportunities for advancement in research laboratories at universities, research institutes or biotechnology companies.

Our research-intensive Ph.D. program prepares students for successful careers as independent scientists and team leaders in academic research, biotechnology and pharmaceutical industries, health and biomedical science management or teaching.

Current Courses:† Search BIOC prefix courses found online at http://apps.ouhsc.edu/StudentInfo/Courses.aspx?College=MED.


College of Public Health

Biostatistics and Epidemiology
801 NE 13th St.
Oklahoma City, OK 73190
(405) 271- 2229

www.coph.ouhsc.edu/departments/bse/default.aspx

Julie Stoner, Ph.D., Chair and Graduate Liaison

8.1 FACULTY ROSTER
For a complete listing of the departmental graduate faculty visit this web site http://graduate.ouhsc.edu/newfacappt/

8.2 GRADUATE DEGREES OFFERED
Master of Science
Doctor of Philosophy

8.4 AREAS OF SPECIALIZATION
Biostatistics and Epidemiology

8.5 PROGRAM OBJECTIVES
The Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology has two main objectives:
1. Teach the concepts of biostatistics and epidemiology essential to all students in the health sciences.

2. Educate master's and doctoral students specializing in the fields of biostatistics or epidemiology leading to master and doctoral degrees in biostatistics or epidemiology.

Although the department functions as a single administrative unit, it includes two distinct disciplines: biostatistics and epidemiology. A student may work toward a master's or doctoral degree in either discipline, depending on his or her interests and background. Each discipline has a different set of required courses; however, there is some flexibility in the program to allow each student to develop his or her strengths and interests through elective courses.

8.6 ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS
In addition to the general admission criteria outlined in the Graduate College and College of Public Health Bulletins, applicants to the Department must also meet the following criteria:

Master's Program Requirements

  1. A baccalaureate degree from an accredited institution (120 semester hours or equivalent, minimum).
  2. A minimum 3.0 grade point average in the last 60 hours Admission with full standing to Masters degree programs requires an undergraduate GPA of 3.0 in the last 60 semester hours of upper division (Junior and Senior level) coursework. If at least 12 semester hours of graduate work have been taken, then the minimum GPA will be based on the graduate work. Individuals who do not meet the GPA requirements may elect to enroll as a Special Student to demonstrate graduate level academic ability, and then reapply to the Department. Up to 12 semester hours of work completed as a Special Student may be applied to the degree program after admission.
  3. Official transcripts from all colleges and universities attended.
  4. A $50.00 application fee.
  5. A completed OUHSC application.
  6. Three letters of recommendation and statement of career goals sent directly to the Department.
  7. A minimum TOEFL score of 570 (international students).

Doctoral Program Requirements

  1. A masterís degree in either biostatistics or epidemiology from an accredited institution, provided that the academic and experience requirements for such a degree are equivalent to those required for the Master's degree at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center.
  2. A graduate grade point average of at least 3.5.
  3. Official transcripts from all colleges and universities attended.
  4. A $50.00 application fee.
  5. A completed OUHSC application.
  6. Three letters of recommendation and statement of career goals sent directly to the Department.
  7. Scores of a GRE taken with the past two years, submitted directly to the Department.
  8. A minimum TOEFL score of 570 Paper-based or 88 IBT.
  9. Written evidence of research experience, if available. These materials will be evaluated for creativity and overall quality. Special preference will be given to applicants with research experience.

8.7 MASTER OF SCIENCE DEGREE REQUIREMENTS
The Master of Science (M.S.) degree is a research oriented degree offered in the area of biostatistics or epidemiology. Requirements for admission are the same as for all M.S. degree programs in the Graduate College and are described elsewhere in this bulletin. Additionally, the department requires three letters of reference and a statement of career goals sent directly to the department.

Graduation requirements include a minimum of 38 semester hours (for the MS in Biostatistics) or 39 semester hours (for the MS in Epidemiology), including no more than 4 semester hours credit for BSE 5980 (Research for Master's Thesis).


The OUTLINE OF GRADUATE WORK for the MASTER OF SCIENCE in BIOSTATISTICS is as follows:

I. Preliminary work necessary to meet departmental requirements.

II. MAJOR DEPARTMENT COURSES.

 

Department

Course No.

Course Title

Credit Hours

BSE
BSE

BSE
BSE
BSE
BSE
BSE
BSE

5001
5013

5113
5163
5173
5703
5733
5980

Problems in Biostatistics & Epidemiology
Applications of Microcomputers to Data Analysis
Principles of Epidemiology
Biostatistics Methods I
Biostatistical Methods II
Principles of the Theory of Probability
Principles of Mathematical Statistics I
Research for Master's Thesis

1
3
3
3
3
3
3
4

 

Plus at least six additional hours in applied biostatistics courses numbered above 5163

Plus at least six additional hours in epidemiology 6

III. Only ONE of the following courses to be taken outside the major department:

 

Department

Course No.

Course Title

Credit Hours

HAP
OEH
HPS

5453
5013
5213

U.S. Health Care Systems
Environmental Health
Social & Behavioral Sciences in
Public Health

3
3
3

 

Total hours 38

The OUTLINE OF GRADUATE WORK for the MASTER OF SCIENCE in EPIDEMIOLOGY is as follows:

I. Preliminary work necessary to meet departmental requirements.

II. MAJOR DEPARTMENT COURSES.

 

Department

Course No.

Course Title

Credit Hours

BSE
BSE
BSE
BSE
BSE
BSE
BSE

BSE

BSE

5001
5013
5113
5163
5193
6194
5980

5303

5363

Problems in Biostatistics & Epidemiology Applications of Microcomputers to Data Analysis Principles of Epidemiology
Biostatistics Methods I
Intermediate Epidemiologic Methods
Advanced Epidemiologic Methods
Research for Master's Thesis

Epidemiology of Infectious Diseases
OR
Epidemiology & Prevention of Chronic Diseases

1
3
3
3
3
4
4

3

3

 

Plus at least six additional hours in epidemiology 6
Plus at least six additional hours in applied biostatistics courses numbered above 5163 6

III. Courses to be taken outside the major department:

***ONLY ONE OF THE FOLLOWING***

 

Department

Course No.

Course Title

Credit Hours

HAP
OEH
HPS

5453
5013
5213

U.S. Health Care Systems
Environmental Health
Social & Behavioral Sciences in Public Health

3
3
3

 


Total hours 39

With written approval of both the departmental chair and the chair of the offering department, a more advanced course may be substituted for any of the core courses. A comprehensive written and/or oral examination is required of each candidate. Other degree requirements will be identified when the student prepares the outline of graduate work in consultation with his/her advisor.

8.8 DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY DEGREE REQUIREMENTS
The Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) is an advanced, research-oriented degree program requiring in-depth study and research in a particular area in biostatistics or epidemiology. General requirements for admission and completion of the degree are consistent with those applicable to all Ph.D. programs as described elsewhere in this bulletin. An applicant must present a master's degree in biostatistics or epidemiology. In addition, three of the five M.P.H. core courses are required. A minimum of 90 semester hours, excluding credit for research tools and including a maximum of 44 hours of transfer credit, must be presented for the degree. No more than 20 hours will be allowed for work related to the dissertation (6980).

All courses, including those related to research tools, must be approved by the student's advisory committee. An advisory committee appointed by the Graduate College upon recommendation of the department will supervise each student's program of study and monitor all coursework. Composed of at least five members, the committee must include at least one representative of a department other than the major one. Defense of the dissertation must be completed within five years of the end of the semester in which the general examination was successfully completed; otherwise, coursework must be revalidated.

8.9 CAREER OPPORTUNITIES
The programs are designed to prepare students for careers in health agencies and health-related institutions; for consultation, especially in biomedical fields; for independent biostatistical and epidemiological research; and for academic careers in schools of medicine or public health.

Current Courses:† Search BSE prefix courses found online at http://apps.ouhsc.edu/StudentInfo/Courses.aspx?College=GRAD


College of Medicine

Cell Biology
†940 Stanton L. Young Blvd.
†Oklahoma City, OK 73190
†(405) 271-2377

http://www.oumedicine.com/cellbiology

Lawrence Rothblum, Ph.D., Chair

Leonidas Tsiokas, Ph.D., Graduate Liaison


9.1 FACULTY ROSTER
For a complete listing of the departmental graduate faculty visit this web site http://graduate.ouhsc.edu/newfacappt/


9.2 DEGREES OFFERED
Doctor of Philosophy

9.3 AREAS OF SPECIALIZATION
Developmental biology, retinal biochemistry; gene regulation, neurobiology of sensory systems, autonomic and cardiovascular pharmacology, nerve regeneration, cell cycle, cancer biology, and cell signaling mechanisms

9.4PROGRAM OBJECTIVES
The graduate program is designed to prepare individuals for academic and research careers in cell biology. Students are encouraged to obtain a broad background in the various disciplines and develop and pursue a research project in one of the areas of scientific investigation currently available in the department.

All degree candidates are encouraged to participate in teaching courses offered by the department. Each student will work with a departmental faculty advisor and a committee composed primarily of departmental faculty members. To fulfill students' specialized needs and interests, the department offers advanced courses taught by faculty whose expertise is closely related to the contents of the course work. Students may also choose curricula that emphasize anatomical or pharmacological studies. Related biomedical courses taught by other departments in the University also are available.

Graduate assistantships and fellowships are available to qualified students on a competitive basis.


9.5 ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS
The department of Cell Biology is a participant in the new interdisciplinary Graduate Program in Biomedical Sciences (GPiBS), which combines the expertise of the six programs at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center: Biochemistry & Molecular Biology, Cell Biology, Microbiology & Immunology, Neuroscience, Pathology and Physiology. Students wishing to enter the Cell Biology graduate program apply to GPiBS as described in the GPiBS section of the Bulletin. An application is filed with the Office of Admissions and is accompanied by official transcripts and results of the Graduate Record Examination (GRE), and TOEFL for foreign applicants. Three letters of recommendation, from individuals who can address the candidateís research potential and suitability for graduate school, are also required.

9.7DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY DEGREE REQUIREMENTS
Candidates for the Ph.D. degree must meet the following minimum requirements:

(1) 90 credit hours acceptable to the student's graduate committee;
(2) obtain at least a B average in the required graduate courses (Integrated Core Curriculum, Cellular and Molecular Developmental Biology, Statistics);
(3) attendance and participation in departmental seminar activity and Journal Club;
(4) successful completion of a comprehensive qualifying examination;
(5) a research proposal, original investigation, written dissertation, and general dissertation defense (A maximum of 60 credit hours is allowed for dissertation research.)
At the discretion of the Graduate Education Committee, equivalent courses from other accredited institutions may be substituted for any of the requirements.

9.8 CAREER OPPORTUNITIES
The interdisciplinary nature of the Cell Biology Graduate program provides students with the breadth of knowledge and technical acumen that is highly sought in today's competitive job market. Graduates from the Cell Biology program have numerous exciting career opportunities in academia, industry, the government, and the private sector. Graduates can devote their careers to full-time research at government-sponsored laboratories or the pharmaceutical industry. Alternatively, a graduate can choose a career in academia, which includes teaching and/or performing basic science research at universities and medical schools.


Current Courses:† Search CTS prefix courses found online at http://apps.ouhsc.edu/studentinfo/Courses.aspx?College=GRAD

College of Allied Health
Communication Sciences and Disorders
825 NE 14th St.
Oklahoma City, OK 73190
(405) 271- 4214

www.ah.ouhsc.edu/csd/default.asp

Stephen W. Painton, Ph.D., Chair
Sarah S. Buckingham, Ph.D., Graduate Liaison

10.1 FACULTY ROSTER
For a complete listing of the departmental graduate faculty visit this web site @ http://graduate.ouhsc.edu/newfacappt/


10.2 DEGREES OFFERED
Master of Science
Doctor of Philosophy

10.3 AREAS OF SPECIALIZATION
Audiology and Speech-Language Pathology

10.4 PROGRAM OBJECTIVE
The Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders offers the following degrees through the Graduate College: The Master of Science (M.S.) degree in speech-language pathology (with thesis) and the Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) degree in the areas of audiology and speech-language pathology. The department also offers the professional doctorate in audiology (Au.D.) and the professional Master of Arts degree in speech-language pathology (M.A.) through the College of Allied Health. Information about all of the departmentís programs may be found at http://www.ah.ouhsc.edu/csd/academic_programs.asp.
Contact information for the different program advisors may also be found at that site.

The Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders is located in the John W. Keys Speech and Hearing Center. This modern, self-contained speech and hearing Center accommodates nearly all academic pursuits as well as department-operated service programs in audiology and speech-language pathology. Ongoing research into normal and disordered processes of human communication is focused in both clinical and basic science areas. State-of-the-art instrumentation is available.

Service programs operated by the Department provide primary practicum sites for educating audiologists and speech-language pathologists. Audiology services include routine hearing and hearing-aid evaluations, hearing-aid dispensing, special physiological tests of auditory function, and aural (re)habilitation protocols. Speech-language pathology services are available for children and adults who present the full array of disorders including those affecting articulation/phonology, language, fluency, and voice. Special diagnostic and treatment programs are available for neurogenic disorders, childhood language disorders, and voice disorders. Additionally, a cleft palate-craniofacial clinic and a diagnostic and staffing conference on speech and language disorders bring together expertise from several disciplines to address complex diagnostic and treatment problems. The department also operates a preschool program for children with developmental language impairments. Where appropriate, diagnostic decisions and management strategies in all areas evolve from an interdisciplinary approach to the amelioration of human communication disorders.

Graduate students in practicum may participate in service programs operated by a number of cooperating agencies, including the Veterans Administration Medical Center, the Department of Otorhinolaryngology, and rehabilitation clinics within several hospitals, private clinics, and public schools.

Assistantships of varying amounts are available to qualified students on both the master's and doctoral levels.

10.5 ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS
Individuals applying to either the M.S. or the Ph.D. program must meet all minimum Graduate College and departmental requirements for admission, including submission of Graduate Record Examination (GRE) scores and scores for the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL), if applicable. Applicants must also submit letters of recommendation from three academic sources and complete an interview with a graduate CSD faculty member or faculty admissions committee. Additional details about admission requirements for the M.S. and Ph.D. programs can be found via links at the following website: http://www.ah.ouhsc.edu/main/academic_programs.asp. Other detailed information about admission and enrollment procedures may be obtained through correspondence with the department chair, the departmentís graduate liaison, and/or the Office of Admissions and Records.

10.6 MASTER OF SCIENCE DEGREE REQUIREMENTS
The Master of Science (M.S.) degree is designed to provide students with the knowledge base and research skills essential for admission into a Ph.D. program in speech-language pathology. This degree sequence is suitable for individuals who seek careers in speech, language, or hearing research but who do not intend to practice clinical speech-language pathology.

The M.S. program of study integrates three curriculum strands: a) scientific and theoretical knowledge in speech-language pathology, b) computer tools and statistical techniques for data analysis, and c) original research culminating in the oral defense of an approved written thesis. Students will complete 46 credit hours of coursework, including seven hours of pre-thesis research-related courses (laboratory rotations, directed readings, and a course in research foundations), six hours of basic statistics, and four hours of thesis research. Students will engage in mentored research activities in a number of their courses and must secure Institutional Review Board (IRB) approval before initiating any research project. Many of the credit hours required for the M.S. degree can also be counted toward the credits needed to complete the Ph.D. in speech-language pathology.
Students in the M.S. program will work under the supervision of an approved three-member graduate faculty committee to complete original thesis research. The committee must approve the written thesis and the oral defense before the degree can be awarded. Students will be asked to present their research findings at a scientific conference and will be encouraged submit their work for publication in a refereed journal.

10.7 DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY DEGREE REQUIREMENTS
The Doctor of Philosophy degree is an advanced degree focusing on in-depth study and research training in speech-language pathology, audiology, speech sciences, or hearing sciences. A minimum of 90 post-baccalaureate semester hours are required for the degree. Students complete 25 semester hours of core doctoral coursework during the first year of enrollment and thereafter pursue approved individualized programs of study. Dissertation research may be conducted in either basic or applied scientific domains. A maximum of 15 semester hours of dissertation credit may be counted toward the 90-semester hour minimum required for the degree. Credit hours earned in clinical practicum may not be counted toward the minimum requirements for the degree. Doctoral students must enroll in dissertation research no later than the first semester following satisfactory completion of the general examination. If requirements for the doctoral degree are not completed within five years subsequent to the satisfactory completion of the general examination, the student's doctoral committee must approve further enrollment in dissertation research and must reassess the currency of the student's knowledge of the field of study. Similar reassessment will be made annually thereafter until the degree requirements are met. Students must have the explicit permission of their advisory committees to complete the dissertation in absentia.

10.8 CAREER OPPORTUNITIES
Graduates of the speech-language pathology and audiology programs have found employment in a variety of settings. Department of Labor projections indicate continuance of a favorable employment status for both professions through 2010 and beyond. Career opportunities for speech-language pathologists (M.A. degree) include: hospital based practice; private practice; K-12 educational systems; university clinics; and home health providers. Audiologists (Au.D. degree) also enjoy a favorable employment outlook based on national forecast data and employment opportunities include: private practice; hospital based practice; medical clinic practice; university practice; and hearing conservation consultation opportunities. Graduates of the M.S. program are prepared for admission into Ph.D. programs in speech-language pathology and are well-qualified for employment as laboratory research assistants. Graduates of the Ph.D. program in either speech-language pathology or audiology are in great demand nationally for employment in university and administrative settings.

Current Courses:† Search CSD prefix courses found online at http://apps.ouhsc.edu/StudentInfo/Courses.aspx?College=GRAD.


College of Medicine

Genetic Counseling

OU Medical Center
OUHCP, Room 12100
1200 N. Phillips
Oklahoma City, OK 73104
(405) 271-8685

Klaas Wierenga, M.D., Program Medical Director

Susan Hassed, M.S., CGC, Licensed Genetic Counselor
Program Director and Graduate Liaison
Susan-hassed@ouhsc.edu

Carrie Guy, MS., LCGC

Program Assistant Director


11.1 PROGRAM INFORMATION
For a detailed description of the department, go to http://www.oumedicine.com/pediatrics/department-sections/genetics/education-training/ms-in-genetic-counseling

11.2 DEGREE OFFERED
Master of Science

11.3 AREAS OF SPECIALIZATION

11.4 PROGRAM OBJECTIVES
The Master of Science in Genetic Counseling is centered in the Department of Pediatrics of the College of Medicine, but involves close collaboration with other departments in the College of Medicine, the College of Public Health, and the Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation. The overall objective of the program is to educate and train master level candidates to become capable of providing genetic counseling to patients and families with known or suspected genetic conditions and to perform basic and/or clinical research in all areas of genetics.

11.5 ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS

†BS/BA in biology, sociology, psychology, or a related field with an undergraduate GPA of 3.0 or greater in upper division courses

 Required Completed Coursework - Biology (two semesters); General Chemistry (two semesters); Organic Chemistry (two semesters); Biochemistry (one semester); Genetics; General Sociology or Psychology (one semester); Abnormal Psychology (one semester); Statistics, Research Methods, or Experimental Design (one semester)

 Completed Course Work, Recommended, if available - Molecular Genetics; Embryology; Anatomy; Medical Terminology; Upper Division Sociology and/or Psychology; Basic Computer Proficiency

 Graduate Record Examination (GRE)

 500 word essay addressing the choice of genetic counseling as a career

 Three letters of recommendation

 Any international applicant whose native language is not English and who does not have a masterís degree from a regionally accredited U.S. graduate school, is required to submit a minimum score of 550 on the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL). The test must have been taken within the two years immediately preceding the requested semester of admission. An original score report is required. Any international applicant who is a resident alien should submit a copy of the Resident alien card along with the application for Admission.

11.6 MASTER OF SCIENCE DEGREE REQUIREMENTS
Taken on a full-time basis, course work will require twenty-one months of study. The total time for classroom courses, practicums, and thesis will be 48 semester hours. Didactic course work will encompass medical genetics, psychosocial theory, counseling techniques, applied clinical and molecular genetics, and cytogenetics. A major element of the educational program will be clinical practicums to provide the students with supervised actual experience in clinical genetics, prenatal diagnosis counseling, cancer genetics counseling, clinical metabolic genetics, and laboratory techniques in cytogenetics, and molecular genetics.

Candidates for the Master of Science in Genetic Counseling must meet requirements for the masterís degree as described elsewhere in this bulletin. The full 48 hours of course work must be completed with a minimum grade point average of 3.0 as well as attendance and/or participation in departmental journal club, grand rounds, clinic case conferences, committee meetings, teaching opportunities, and support group meetings is required. There must be satisfactory completion of a thesis proposal:  an original investigation, a written thesis, and oral comprehensive defense examination.  You may submit the essay via email to Susan Hassed at the email address above.

Application deadline is February 1, of the year of admission.† Application can be made online at http://www.ouhsc.edu/admissions/applyonline.html

11.7 CAREER OPPORTUNITIES
Genetic counseling as a profession includes positions in private industry, laboratories, research units, and private physician groups as well as in academic centers. Many genetic counselors function as co-investigators or primary investigators for varied projects from clinical studies to laboratory investigations including work on the Genome project. For more detailed information about genetic counseling as a career visit the website for the National Society of Genetic Counselors at http://www.nsgc.org/

Current Courses:† Search GENC prefix courses found online at http://apps.ouhsc.edu/StudentInfo/Courses.aspx?College=GRAD

College of Public Health

Health Promotion Sciences
†801 NE 13th St.
Oklahoma City, OK 73190
†(405) 271- 2017
www.coph.ouhsc.edu/departments/hps/default.aspx

Gary Raskob, Ph.D., Interim Chair

Roy Oman, Ph.D., Professor & Vice Chair

12.1
FACULTY ROSTER
For a complete listing of the departmental graduate faculty visit this web site
http://graduate.ouhsc.edu/newfacappt/

12.2 GRADUATE DEGREES OFFERED
Master of Science
Doctor of Philosophy

12.3 AREAS OF SPECIALIZATION
Faculty expertise in health promotion sciences includes anthropology, family studies, gerontology, health education, health promotion, psychology, research methods, sociology, social work, and other related disciplines. The department has identified minority health/health disparities as a major emphasis of research and instruction.

12.4 PROGRAM OBJECTIVES
The Department of Health Promotion Sciences prepares public health professionals for leadership roles in the development, promotion, and application of social and behavioral science and educational theory as well as methods for solving community health problems. Courses and degree programs are directed toward two groups of students: those who wish to pursue a graduate degree in the field, and those disciplines who seek supporting knowledge in the field. Concentration of graduate studies in the Department of Health Promotion Sciences may lead to a Master of Science or Doctor of Philosophy degree. In addition to the degree requirements established for the College of Public Health, departmental requirements for degree programs may apply.

12.5 MASTER OF SCIENCE DEGREE REQUIREMENTS
The Master of Science (M.S.) degree is a departmental degree oriented toward research in the specialty area within public health. Requirements for admission are the same as for all M.S. degree programs in the Graduate College and are described elsewhere in this bulletin.

Graduation requirements include a minimum of 36 semester hours and a thesis, with no more than four semester hours allowed for work related to the thesis (5980). At least three of the five core courses required of the M.P.H. degree must be included in the M.S. requirements. With written approval of both the student's departmental chair and the chair of the offering department, a more advanced course may be substituted for any of the core courses. All degree candidates are required to successfully defend their thesis.

12.6 DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY DEGREE REQUIREMENTS
The Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) is an advanced, research-oriented degree designed for those intending to pursue research or teaching. General requirements for admission and completion of the degree are consistent with those applicable to all Ph.D. programs as described elsewhere in this bulletin. A Masters degree in Public Health (or relevant Master's degree and completion of the core public health courses); 3.5 GPA and suitable GRE score; 235 TOEFL; identification of a potential faculty mentor (two faculty members with whom the student would like to study); evidence of writing and research ability; and a statement of purpose. Conditional admittance may be conferred for students who do not meet all of the admission requirements. A minimum of 60 semester hours post-masters must be presented for the degree. No more than 30 hours will be allowed for work related to the dissertation (6980).

The curriculum is composed of a the HPS Core (9 hours), Research Methods (15 hours), a minor field (9 hours) and coursework in a substantive area (15 hours). Minor and substantive area requirements must be approved by the student's advisory committee. The comprehensive exam is composed of individual exams in three areas: Theory, Methods, and Substantive Area. The Theory and Methods portions of the exam are departmental exams. Any faculty member in the department can submit questions and serve as a reader. The Theory and Methods exams must have no fewer than three readers. The Substantive Area exam will be given by the student's dissertation committee. The five-member dissertation committee will be composed of 3 faculty members from HPS, 1 from COPH or the substantive area and 1 member from the minor area.

12.8 CAREER OPPORTUNITIES
The degree programs in the department prepare students for career opportunities with such organizations as federal, state, and local public health agencies; short- and long-term health care institutions; voluntary health agencies; universities, colleges, and public schools; state and local community mental health agencies; business and industry; and other health related agencies.

Current Courses:† Search HPS prefix courses found online at http://apps.ouhsc.edu/StudentInfo/Courses.aspx?College=GRAD


College of Medicine

Microbiology and Immunology
940 Stanton L. Young Blvd.
Oklahoma City, OK 73190
(405) 271-2133
www.oumedicine.com/mi

Jimmy Ballard, Ph.D., Chair
Molly Hill, Ph.D., Graduate Liaison

13.1 FACULTY ROSTER
For a complete listing of the departmental graduate faculty visit this web site

http://www.oumedicine.com/mi/faculty

13.2 DEGREES OFFERED
Doctor of Philosophy

13.3 AREA OF SPECIALIZATION
Microbial Pathogenesis and Immunology:  Special emphasis on molecular and immunological mechanisms of diseases caused by human pathogens as well as emphasis on immune response to infections, autoimmunity, T and B cell development and MHC function.

13.4 PROGRAMS OBJECTIVES
The doctoral program prepares students for careers in academia and industry in the research areas of microbiology and immunology.   The curriculum is designed to provide a solid scientific background and includes advanced courses utilizing the expertise of our faculty members. Research areas include bacterial toxins, Lyme disease, biofilms and oral microbiology, bacterial genetics, B lymphocyte biology, NKT cells and humoral immunity, host immune response to Herpes simplex viruses, protective immunity to the malaria parasite, autoimmunity , role of major histocompatibility complex molecules in cancer and infection, and the role of IL-22 in inflamed tissues..

13.5 ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS
The department of Microbiology and Immunology is a participant in the interdisciplinary
Graduate Program in Biomedical Sciences (GPiBS), which combines the expertise of the six programs at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center: Biochemistry & Molecular Biology, Cell Biology, Microbiology & Immunology, Neuroscience, Pathology and Physiology. Students wishing to enter the Microbiology and Immunology graduate program to obtain a Ph.D. degree should apply to GPiBS as described in the GPiBS section of the Bulletin. An application is filed with the Office of Admissions and is accompanied by official transcripts and results of the Graduate Record Examination (GRE), and TOEFL for foreign applicants. Three letters of recommendation, from individuals who can address the candidateís research potential and suitability for graduate school, are also required.

13.6 DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY DEGREE REQUIREMENTS
Students interested in the Ph.D. degree in Microbiology and Immunology are required to take a minimum of 90 hours of graduate work of which at least 45 hours are MI 6980 (Research for Doctorís Dissertation) and complete a dissertation based on original research. All Ph.D. students must complete the core courses offered in the first semester through the GPiBS program.  Subsequent courses are offered by the Department and include the following:  Basic Immunology (MI 6032), Immunity in Disease(MI 6111), Basic Bacteriology (MI 5320), Molecular Structure and Dynamics: Molecular Virology (MI 6501), Basic Microbiology (MI 6301), and Molecular Microbiology (MI 6501). In the second year students are required to take Microbial Pathogenesis (MI 6853), Advanced Immunology (MI 6483) and Special Studies (MI 5990). In addition, all Ph.D. candidates take MI 6980, Research for the Doctoral Dissertation. Ph.D. students are required to present seminars (variable number of hours) in MI 5971, Seminar. The remainder of the Ph.D. degree program is completed with graduate level courses in this or in other departments of the University. Requirements for any of the individual core courses may be waived by the departmental orientation committee with sufficient evidence of equivalent prior course completion. A student may transfer up to 44 hours of graduate course work taken elsewhere depending upon the decision of the studentís advisory committee and the Graduate College (described elsewhere in Bulletin).

For admission to candidacy for the Ph.D. degree, the student must pass a written and oral qualifying examination. The examination is offered once a year and should be completed by the end of the second year.

Financial support is provided to qualified students entering the program.

13.7 CAREER OPPORTUNITIES
Students who complete a Ph.D. program in Microbiology and Immunology find future employment in research and/or teaching at academic institutions, research institutes, biotechnology companies and pharmaceutical companies. In addition, positions are available in clinical laboratory settings.

Current Courses:† Search MI prefix courses found online at http://apps.ouhsc.edu/StudentInfo/Courses.aspx?College=GRAD

 

College of Medicine

Oklahoma Center for Neuroscience
975 NE 10 th Street, Room 272
Oklahoma City, OK 73104
(405) 271- 6267

www.oumedicine.com/ocns

Beverley Greenwood-Van Meerveld, Ph.D., Director, Oklahoma Center for Neuroscience

James McGinnis, Ph.D., Associate Director and Chair, Graduate Education Committee

John Campbell, Ph.D., Associate Director of Special Programs

David Sherry, Ph.D., Associate Director for Curriculum Development

Michelle Callegan, Ph.D., Associate Director for Research

Calin Prodan, M.D., Associate Director for Clinical Research

14.1 FACULTY ROSTER
For a complete listing of the departmental graduate faculty visit this web site
http://graduate.ouhsc.edu/newfacappt/

14.2 DEGREES OFFERED
Master of Science
Doctor of Philosophy

14.3 PROGRAM OBJECTIVES
The Graduate Program in Neuroscience emphasizes a multidisciplinary approach to understand the structure and function of the normal and diseased nervous system. The diversity of research represented in this program spans focus areas from molecular neuroscience and systems neurobiology, to functional neuroscience. Molecular neuroscience involves biochemical investigations at the cellular and molecular levels and includes studies on neurotransmitter systems, pharmacology of neurotransmission, interactions of drugs with receptors, gene regulation, molecular biology of neurological disease, and mechanisms of signal transduction. Systems neurobiology encompasses studies of multi-neuronal networks that range from neural circuitry underlying the control of cardiac and respiratory function to endocrine control, stress and pain mechanisms. Functional neuroscience includes the disciplines of neurology, biological psychology, and behavioral neuroscience. Students in the Graduate Program in Neuroscience are exposed to all focus areas, providing a strong inter-disciplinary foundation on which to build comprehensive and innovative research programs.

14.4 ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS
Students in the Ph.D. program in neuroscience currently enter through either the Graduate Program in Biomedical Sciences (GPiBS), which serves as a gateway into the basic science graduate programs at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center or directly into the Neuroscience Program. First year graduate students entering through GPiBS complete interdisciplinary coursework emphasizing molecular aspects of cell and organismal biology, along with research rotation(s)during the first year. First year graduate students entering directly into the Neuroscience program complete the first semester of the inter-disciplinary coursework emphasizing molecular aspects of cell biology, the second semester they complete Medical Neuroscience, along with research rotation(s). After the first year, graduate students in neuroscience complete advanced neuroscience coursework and their dissertation research. †A total of 90 credit hours are required for a Ph.D. in Neuroscience.

An application is filed with the Office of Admissions and is accompanied by official transcripts and results of the Graduate Record Examination (GRE), and TOEFL for foreign applicants. Three letters of recommendation that address the candidateís research potential and suitability for graduate school and a goals/purpose statement are also required.

Students who already have a Masterís degree or those who have completed graduate level coursework equivalent to the GPiBS curriculum and wish to apply for a Ph.D. should contact directly the Graduate Program in Neuroscience. Admission for the M.S. degree is also routed directly through the Graduate Program in Neuroscience. For more information about admission into the Graduate Program in Neuroscience, please call (405)271-6267.

14.5 MASTER OF SCIENCE DEGREE REQUIREMENTS
Admission requirements are the same for the M.S. degree as for the doctoral program. The Master of Science program has the option of a thesis masters degree that requires successful completion of a minimum of 31 credit hours or a non-thesis masterís degree with a minimum of 33 credit hours (3.0 GPA on all graduate level coursework). The course work consists of required or core courses and elective courses selected based on individualized career plans. A maximum of 8 graduate credit hours can be transferred from other institutions. The thesis masterís degree will require at least 4 credit hours of thesis research and satisfactory completion in defending his/her masterís thesis. For the non thesis masters degree, a satisfactory performance on a comprehensive exam is required.

14.6 DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY DEGREE REQUIREMENTS
All doctoral students must successfully complete 90 credit hours of course work, pass a written and oral qualifying examination, and defend their dissertation research in a public forum. In addition, students will be required to participate in the Neuroscience Journal Club, Seminar Series, Neuroscience Symposium, Meet the Professor Breakfasts, Neuro Nights and take the following courses: Neurobiology of Disease, Neuroanatomy, Neurophysiology, Current Topics in Neuroscience, and Neuroscience Methods.

14.7 CAREER OPPORTUNITIES
The interdisciplinary nature of the Graduate Program in Neuroscience provides students with the breadth of knowledge and technical acumen that is highly sought in todayís competitive job market. Therefore, individuals who graduate with a Ph.D. in Neuroscience have a number of exciting and rewarding career opportunities in academic research, biotechnology, pharmaceutical companies, teaching, medical and technical writing, and health and bioscience management.

Career opportunities in neuroscience are expected to increase with countless diseases affecting the nervous system still in need of a cure. The importance of Neuroscience is better shown by the listed statistics. An estimated 4.5 million Americans have Alzheimerís disease and that number expected to double by 2025 and an estimated 400,000 Americans have Multiple Sclerosis with 200 more people being diagnosed weekly. A staggering 2.7 million Americans of all ages are affected by epilepsy and seizures, and the list continues with Huntingtonís Disease, Lou Gehrigís Disease, Strokes and many others. Paul Lauterbur, Sir Peter Mansfield, Roderick MacKinnon, Linda Buck and Richard Axel are the latest of a long string of neuroscientists who have been named Nobel Laureates. Neuroscience is an exciting frontier. We invite you to become a part of this discovery process.

Current Courses:† Search OCNS prefix courses found online at http://apps.ouhsc.edu/StudentInfo/Courses.aspx?College=GRAD.

College of Nursing

Nursing
1100 N. Stonewall
Oklahoma City, OK 73190
(405) 271- 2428
http://nursing.ouhsc.edu/Academic_Programs/PhD/index.htm

Lazelle E. Benefield, Ph.D., R.N., FAAN, Dean

Gary Loving, Ph.D., R.N., C.N.E, Associate Dean for Academic Programs and Graduate Liaison

15.1† F ACULTY ROSTER
For a complete listing of the departmental graduate faculty visit this web site http://graduate.ouhsc.edu/newfacappt/ ††

15.2† DEGREES OFFERED
Master of Science
Doctor of Philosophy

15.3 AREAS OF SPECIALIZATION

ē PhD in Nursing Ė 90 hours

15.4 DOCTOR OF PHILOPHY (PhD) in NURSING DEGREE
The PhD Program in Nursing is designed to prepare nurse scholars to advance the science, art, and practice of the discipline. Doctoral preparation in Nursing promotes knowledge development, organization, and application of theory and evidence-based scholarly nursing practice. Our collaborative PhD program prepares nurses to develop and utilize knowledge in many roles, including:
• Researcher
• Educator
• Administrator
• Clinician
• Health care policy maker
PhD students’ research will fall alongside one or more faculty member’s expertise, some place within the continuum of vulnerabilities across diverse populations. See Faculty Research. Courses are competency-based. The intent is for the PhD program to be distance accessible. Presently, the curriculum of the PhD program has courses available in traditional classroom, online, and IP video.

15.5 ADMISSION REQUIRMENTS FOR THE PHD IN NURSING
1. Graduate Record Exam (GRE) scores taken in the past five years of the application date for Verbal, Quantitative, and Writing exams. The desired scores are 550 or above for the Verbal and Quantitative exams, respectively, and 4 or above for the Writing exam. Test scores over 10 years old will not be accepted.
2. TOEFL for international applications (no more than two years old). The desired scores are at least 600 for the paper-based test or 100IBT.
3. Goal Statement. See application for guidelines for statement. Please indicate your area(s) of research interest or focus.
4. Three letters of recommendation (use recommendation form file for recommendations).
5. Official Transcripts from Master’s degree coursework. Cumulative grade point average of 3.5 on a 4.0 scale for Master’s and subsequent coursework is desired or official Transcripts from Undergraduate degree coursework (GPA of 3.5 or above is desired).
6. Copy of resume or Curriculum Vita (CV).
7. Supplemental Application for the PhD in Nursing Program
8. Interviews with two PhD nursing faculty members, in person or via telephone conference (we arrange this).
9. Computer Requirements for OUCN Students—Effective Fall of 1998 all students will be required to own a computer. Specific computer and software requirements will be shared with students at orientation. Financial aid may be obtained for the purchase of required equipment.

15.6 CAREER OPPORTUNITIES
Nursing graduates have excellent employment opportunities in all geographic regions.

Current Courses:  Search NURS prefix courses found online at http://apps.ouhsc.edu/StudentInfo/Courses.aspx?College=GRAD.

College of Allied Health

Nutritional Sciences
1200 N. Stonewall Avenue
Oklahoma City, OK 73117-1215
(405) 271- 2113

www.ah.ouhsc.edu/ns/

Allen Knehans, Ph.D., Program Director and Graduate Liaison

16.1 FACULTY ROSTER
For a complete listing of the departmental graduate faculty visit this web site
http://graduate.ouhsc.edu/newfacappt/.

16.2 DEGREES OFFERED
Master of Science

16.3 AREAS OF SPECIALIZATION
Nutritional Sciences

16.4 PROGRAM OBJECTIVES
The graduate program in the Department of Nutritional Sciences is a flexible program whose primary goal is to provide advanced education, training, and research to selected students desiring to develop mastery in an area of nutrition.

16.5 ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS

1. Submission of completed application (including supplemental application from the College of Allied Health);

2. Minimum 3.0 cumulative GPA on last 60 hours of undergraduate work or the last twelve hours of graded graduate course work (please note: in calculating GPA, the entire semester in which the last 60 hours fall is counted);

3. Department interview;

4. TOEFL score of 550 or greater from a student for whom English is a second language;

5. B.S. degree (from accredited college or university) in nutrition or dietetics, or permission of Department;

6. Completion of the following prerequisites: Biochemistry; Human Physiology; Introductory Nutrition.


16.6 MASTER OF SCIENCE DEGREE REQUIREMENTS
This degree program requires a minimum of 34 semester hours, and students may pursue either a thesis or a non-thesis option. The thesis option requires 17-19 hours of core course work (seminar, research methods, statistics, thesis, energy nutrients, and non-energy nutrients) ; 10 additional hours are to be taken from Departmental offerings, and the remaining five-seven hours may be electives from any area. The non-thesis option requires 16 hours of core course work (seminar, research methods, statistics, masters project, energy nutrients, and non-energy nutrients); 12 additional hours are to be taken form Departmental offerings, and the remaining six hours may be taken from any area.

16.8 CAREER OPPORTUNITIES
A wide variety of job opportunities are available for graduates of the program. Graduates may be employed in public health settings, hospitals, clinics, local/state/federal government agencies, wellness centers, private practice, food companies, universities (teaching and research), private industry, and other areas. Marketability is significantly greater if the individual is registry-eligible or a Registered Dietitian.

Current Courses:† Search NS prefix courses found online at http://apps.ouhsc.edu/StudentInfo/Courses.aspx?College=GRAD.


College of Allied Health

Occupational and Environmental Health
†801 NE 13th St.
Oklahoma City, OK 73190
(405) 271- 2070

www.coph.ouhsc.edu/departments/oeh/default.aspx

Robert Lynch, Ph.D., Chair and Graduate Liaison

17.1 FACULTY ROSTER
For a complete listing of the departmental graduate faculty visit this web site http://graduate.ouhsc.edu/newfacappt/

17.2 GRADUATE DEGREES OFFERED
Master of Science
Doctor of Philosophy

17.3 AREAS OF SPECIALIZATION
The Department of Occupational and Environmental Health strives to unite interdisciplinary training and research for persons grounded in natural, physical, and health sciences.  This facilitates understanding of human responses to the environment and environmental responses to the activities of humans.    Flexible and diversified graduate study, field training, and basic and applied research accommodate students from a wide range of academic and occupational backgrounds.  The Doctor of Philosophy degree requires in-depth study in a specialty within the broad field of occupational and environmental health.   The Master of Science area of focus is a combined Environmental Health Sciences/Industrial Hygiene track which is ABET-accredited. 

17.5 PROGRAM OBJECTIVES
The environment encompasses not only the natural surroundings -- the air, the water, the plants and animals used for food -- but also shelter, occupational environments, modes of transportation and all other products of technology, including pollutants and waste materials, all of which interact to affect health. Environmental considerations become increasingly important during these times of changing emphasis in the fields of energy, economics, and technology.

The objective of the Department of Occupational and Environmental Health is to unite an interdisciplinary training and research program for persons grounded in natural, physical, and health sciences in order to develop an understanding of human response to the environment, as well as the response of the environment to the activities of humans.

Toward this end, the department has developed flexible and diversified programs of graduate study, field training, and basic and applied research to accommodate students with a wide range of academic and occupational backgrounds. Most courses are offered in the late afternoon and evening format for the convenience of practicing professionals.
The graduate programs in occupational medicine for physicians and occupational health for physician assistants are broad-based and designed to prepare the physician and physician assistant to assume a responsible role in the care and management of occupationally-related diseases and injuries, and in the health maintenance of the worker in the occupational environment.

17.6 ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS
In addition to the general admission requirements, applicants to the Department must also meet the following criteria: Baccalaureate degree (120 semester hours minimum) with a 3.00 GPA in the last 60 hours; a minimum of 60 semester hours of undergraduate and/or graduate-level courses in basic sciences, mathematics, engineering and technology, with at least 15 of these credit hours at the upper level (junior, senior or graduate).

Basic Sciences (e.g. physics, chemistry, and the life and earth sciences). At least 12-semester hours credit in chemistry, including organic, is required*. Courses in Physics with laboratory, and the life and earth sciences including General Biology and Human Physiology are desirable.

Mathematics including College Algebra, which is required, and differential and integral calculus, which are desirable. Some computer science and statistics courses may be considered applied mathematics and included in this category.

Engineering and Technology
courses are those that apply mathematics and basic sciences to creative applications and viable solutions.

Also required is a minimum of 21 semester hours in communications, humanities, and social sciences. Course work in written and oral communications is required.

* Those who matriculate with deficiencies up to 12-semester hours credit of these requirements will be required to meet the full entrance requirements within the first 20 semester credit hours of graduate course work. No course taken as part of a degree program requirements can be used to satisfy the admission criteria.

In addition to the general admission requirements, applicants must submit three letters of reference that support admission to the program and assess the applicants' scholastic and professional abilities.

The Graduate Record Examination (GRE) is required for all programs.
Physician assistants wishing to enter the occupational health program must be certified, and physicians wishing to enter the occupational medicine program must be eligible to practice medicine in the State of Oklahoma. Physicians should be aware that the there is no clinical component to the occupational medicine program for physicians.

17.7 MASTER OF SCIENCE DEGREE REQUIREMENTS
Students interested in developing research capabilities in a specialty area within the broad field of occupational and environmental health usually select the M.S.

Including thesis credit, a minimum of approximately 41 semester hours is required to complete the degree, with a maximum of nine semester hours of approved transfer work. With written approval of both the student's departmental chair and the chair of the offering department, a more advanced course may be substituted for any of the core courses. A thesis research training project is required for all M.S. students, except that the thesis may be waived in favor of additional coursework if (a) the student has already completed a thesis as part of a previous masters degree and the thesis is deemed by the Department Chair and the faculty to represent research method training equivalent to that required by the department, or (b) the student can demonstrate command of research skills through first authorship of data-based peer-reviewed scientific publications as deemed acceptable by the department Chair and the faculty. A written comprehensive examination, including the thesis defense (except when thesis has been waived), also is required.

17.8 DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY DEGREE REQUIREMENTS
The Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) is an advanced research-oriented degree program requiring in-depth study of and research in a specialty area within the broad field of occupational and environmental health. General requirements for admission and completion of the degree are consistent with those applicable to all Ph.D. programs as described elsewhere in this bulletin. Minimum requirements are 90 semester hours, including approved transfer work but excluding any credit for research tools.

The Ph.D. curriculum contains twelve (12) or more credits of supporting courses outside of the defined specialization. These courses may be selected from the formal courses offered by the department or elsewhere, or may be specifically offered for the student in the form of Directed Readings. All courses, including those related to research tools, must be approved by the student's advisory committee. A dissertation must be presented and successfully defended. No more than 30 hours will be allowed for work related to the dissertation (OEH 6980).

To be admitted to the Ph.D. program, the candidate must hold a Masterís degree from an accredited institution in a related field and display a clear research orientation and firm knowledge of research techniques.  The Master's degree must be from an institution which has English as its primary language of instruction or the candidate must have scored a minimum of 90 (120 scale) on the TOEFL. The applicant must be accepted by the Department and be admitted into the doctoral program by the Graduate Dean.  Applicants are also required to take the Graduate Record Exam (GRE).

17.9 CAREER OPPORTUNITIES
A partial listing of locations where Occupational and Environmental Health graduates may be employed includes: private industry (especially in the energy sector); insurance companies that insure industry; city and state health departments; state departments labor and of environmental quality; federal government agencies including the Department of Labor (Occupational Safety and Health Administration and Mine Safety and Health Administration), Department of Health and Human Services (the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health and the Center for Disease Control and Prevention), the Department of Energy (e.g. the National Laboratories), and the US Environmental Protection Agency, to name a few; the uniformed services (Navy, Army, Air Force, Public Health Service, and Coast Guard) both as civilian employees and uniformed officers; consulting companies; law firms; health and safety equipment manufacturers and marketers; healthcare facilities and organizations; and universities.

Current Courses:† Search OEH prefix courses found online at http://apps.ouhsc.edu/StudentInfo/Courses.aspx?College=GRAD.


College of Dentistry

ORTHODONTICS
1201 North Stonewall, Rm. 400
PO Box 26901
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73190

dentistry.ouhsc.edu/ProspectiveSTudents/ProgramsOffered/AdvancedEducationPrograms/GraduateOrthodontics.aspx

G. Frans Currier, D.D.S., M.S.D., M.Ed., David Ross Boyd Professor and Chair

Onur Kadioglu, D.D.S., Graduate Program Director

18.1 FACULTY ROSTER
For a complete listing of the departmental graduate faculty visit this web site
http://graduate.ouhsc.edu/newfacappt/

18.2 DEGREE OFFERED
Master of Science

18.3 AREAS OF SPECIALIZATION
Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics

18.4 PROGRAM OBJECTIVES
To meet the need for patient care and research in the field of orthodontics, a graduate program in this dental specialty was established in 1981. The program prepares dental graduates to manage the full range of dentofacial discrepancies which fall within the responsibility of the orthodontist. Current knowledge and research findings are applied to patient care in all age groups. A thesis is required. The degree awarded is a Master of Science, with orthodontics as the area of specialization.

18.5 ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS
All students in the graduate program must hold a D.D.S. or equivalent. To be accepted for admission, the applicant must submit a letter of recommendation from the dean of the dental school which awarded the degree that includes class rank and dental school grade point average of the applicant. Three additional letters of recommendation are required; at least two of these letters should be from former faculty. A personal interview will be requested of applicants.

The length of the program is a minimum period of 30 months. Additional time commitment may be required for satisfactory completion of clinical and thesis requirements. The program begins on July 1 of each year. Deadline for application is September 1 of the year preceding the year of desired admission. Potential students are asked to correspond directly with the department for additional information about the graduate program.

18.6 MASTER OF SCIENCE DEGREE REQUIREMENTS
Patients assigned for treatment under faculty supervision will present a spectrum of orthodontic problems. Before graduating, the student must be deemed proficient in both didactic course work and the clinical discipline of orthodontics by department faculty. The core curriculum consists of 36 credit hours including sciences that are basic to orthodontics. In addition, the student will be registered for a minimum of eight credit hours in Research for Master's Thesis and eight credit hours in Clinical Practice of the specialty. The student also may be required to register for courses with variable credit hours. Usually the program involves 70 credit hours.

The master's thesis, based on original research, may focus on a number of topics in growth and development, as well as function of the stomatognathic system. Other reasonable areas for study include factors related to balance or imbalance of dental occlusion, temporomandibular joint dysfunction, materials relevant to orthodontic practice, biologic tissue response, and physical or social adjustment of patients. Facilities exist at the Health Sciences Center to conduct research related to these topics. Students will be assigned limited teaching responsibilities in the predoctoral dental program.

18.7 CAREER OPPORTUNITIESS
Most orthodontists have full-time private practices of the specialty. However, there are other career opportunities, one of which is academics. There is currently a significant need for full-time faculty nationwide. There are opportunities also with the military and the public health services. Part-time opportunities in academics are also available.

Current Courses:† Search ORTHO prefix courses found online at http://apps.ouhsc.edu/StudentInfo/Courses.aspx?College=GRAD


College of Medicine

Pathology

940 Stanton L. Young Blvd.
Oklahoma City, OK 73190
(405) 271- 2693

http://www.oumedicine.com/pathology/general-program-info

Michael L. Talbert, M.D., Chair
Zhizhuang Joe Zhao , Ph.D., Graduate Liaison

19.1 FACULTY ROSTER
For a complete listing of the departmental graduate faculty visit this web site
http://graduate.ouhsc.edu/newfacappt/

19.2 DEGREES OFFERED
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)

19.3 AREAS OF SPECIALIZATION
Molecular pathology, cancer biology, cancer therapeutics, immunopathology, vascular cell biology, neuropathology, autoimmunity, innate immunity, hematological malignancies, inflammation, Alzheimerís disease, aging, hematopoiesis, intracellular trafficking, signal transduction, and nanotechnology.

19.4 PROGRAM OBJECTIVES
The Graduate Program in Pathology seeks to further the missions of education/research and enhance the growth of biomedical sciences in Oklahoma by educating students in the basic and clinical aspects of Pathology and preparing scientists to be contributors in biomedical research. The discipline of Pathology encompasses and bridges basic and clinical research. Pathology uses cutting-edge molecular, immunologic, biochemical, and genetic tools to uncover the mechanisms of disease and how cells and tissues respond. Graduates of the program will be prepared for careers in biomedical research and for a future as an independent investigator.

19.5 ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS
Qualified students possessing baccalaureate degrees in a biological science, e.g. biology, biochemistry, cell biology, chemistry, microbiology, molecular biology, or zoology, may pursue a Ph.D. degree in Pathology. Students desiring to enter the Pathology Graduate Program should apply to the Graduate Program in Biomedical Sciences (GPiBS). Application materials for GPiBS may be requested from Melissa-pinkston@ouhsc.edu.† †Applicants must follow the general admission procedures and requirements set forth by GPiBS. An application must be filled with the Office of Admissions and be accompanied by official transcripts, Graduate Record Examination (GRE) results, and, for foreign applicants, TOEFL results. In addition, three letters of recommendation from individuals who can address the applicantís research potential and suitability for graduate study are required. In special cases, students may apply for admission directly into the Pathology Graduate Program. For further information regarding admission into Pathology, contact melanie-beery@ouhsc.edu is also required.

19.6 DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY DEGREE REQUIREMENTS
Pathology is a participating department in GPiBS, along with Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Cell Biology, Microbiology and Immunology, Neuroscience, Pharmaceutical Sciences, and Physiology. GPiBS students participate in a common integrated first-year curriculum which includes three laboratory rotations from a list of mentoring faculty and attendance of seminars and journal club. After completing the GPiBSí curriculum, a student may choose a research mentor (major advisor) affiliated with Pathology and set up an advisory committee. In the fall semester of the second year, Pathology graduate students will enroll in advanced courses pertaining to the study of pathology. A student will be allowed to enroll in advanced electives as deemed appropriate by his/her major advisor. A student directly admitted into the Pathology Graduate Program will be placed in the research mentorís laboratory without participating in the GPiBS rotations; however, the student will be required to complete the GPiBS curriculum unless equivalent course have been previously completed.

A Pathology graduate student must pass both written and oral qualifying examinations to be admitted to candidacy for the Ph.D. degree. For the written examination, a student will submit an NIH-style research proposal. This proposal must also be defended at an oral examination where the studentís ability to synthesize and apply information to investigative endeavors will be assessed. Successful completion of the written and oral examinations will result in formal admission to candidacy for the degree. The studentís major advisor and advisory committee will be responsible for assisting with the research project and for preparing the student for a final defense of the dissertation. The student will be responsible for the cost and preparation of the dissertation.

19.7 CAREER OPPRORTUNITIES
Students receiving a Ph.D. degree in Pathology will be prepared for biomedical research careers in academic institutions, hospitals, biotechnology companies, and pharmaceutical industries.

Current Courses:† Search PATH prefix courses found online at http://apps.ouhsc.edu/StudentInfo/Courses.aspx?College=GRAD


College of Dentistry
Periodontics
1201 N. Stonewall Avenue
Oklahoma City, OK 73190
(405) 271-6531
dentistry.ouhsc.edu/ProspectiveStudents/ProgramsOffered/AdvancedEducationPrograms/GraduatePeriodontics.aspx

Eros S. Chaves, DDS, MS, DMD, MBA Director, Graduate Liaison

20.1 FACULTY ROSTER
For a complete listing of the departmental graduate faculty visit this web site
http://graduate.ouhsc.edu/newfacappt/

20.2 DEGREE OFFERED
Certificate in Periodontics and Master of Science

20.3 AREAS OF SPECIALIZATION
Periodontics

20.4 PROGRAM OBJECTIVES
The Advanced Educational Program in Periodontics is a fully accredited three-year program by the Commission of Dental Organization of the American Dental Association (CODA).  This program is directed toward providing opportunities for the development of expert clinicians and periodontists who have a background of comprehensive clinical experiene, current basic science knowledge relevant to dentistry and periodontics, and research methodology.  Successful completion of the 36-month program leads to the Master of Science degree awarded by the OUHSC Graduate College.  A successful completion of a research thesis based on an investigative project is required of each candidate in order to receive the Master of Science degree.

20.5 ADMISSIONREQUIREMENTS
All students in the Graduate Periodontics Program must hold a dental degree. Admission in full standing requires a letter from the dean of the dental school from which the dental degree was awarded. This letter must include the class rank and dental school grade point average of the applicant or explain their school grading system. Two additional letters of recommendation are desired; at least two of these letters should be from former faculty. A personal interview may be requested of applicants.

Students begin the 36-month program in July of each year. Deadline for application is August 15, of the year preceding desired admission.

All students must be approved for admission by the Dean of the Graduate College upon recommendation of the program director.

20.6 MASTER OF SCIENCE DEGREE REQUIREMENTS
The curriculum of the program is designed to meet the formal educational requirements for eligibility to take the certification examination of the American Board of Periodontology.

The program has an emphasis on advanced level academic courses, clinical and research.  In addition to the biological, medical and dental courses, a significant emphasis is placed on the development of clinical skills, diagnosis and treatment planning of complex periodontal cases. Students are exposed to the value and necessity of comprehensive patient care based on the strongest scientific information available.

The clinical and research experience in this graduate program is advanced and sophisticated in nature to qualify the graduate student to perform complicated procedures that are beyond the scope of general practitioners.

20.7 CAREER OPPORTUNITIES
Graduates of this advanced education program in Periodontics are prepared to enter careers in clinical practice, teaching and research and eligible to take the American Board of Periodontology examination..


College of Pharmacy

Graduate Pharmaceutical Sciences

1110 N. Stonewall Oklahoma City, OK 73126-0901 (405) 271-6485

http://pharmacy.ouhsc.edu/graduate

Nathan Shankar, Ph.D., Chair and Graduate Liaison

21.1 FACULTY ROSTER

For a complete listing of the departmental graduate faculty visit this web site and select ďGraduate Pharmaceutical SciencesĒ in the drop-down menu for departments:

http:graduate.ouhsc.edu/newfacappt/

21.2 DEGREES OFFERED

Master of Science

Master of Science/Doctor of Pharmacy

21.3 AREAS OF SPECIALIZATION Medicinal Chemistry, Nuclear Pharmacy, Pharmaceutics, Pharmacology, Infectious Disease, Toxicology, Pharmacy Administration

21.4 PROGRAM OBJECTIVES The Department of Graduate Pharmaceutical Sciences offers graduate degree programs leading to both the Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy degrees. These degree programs are designed to prepare scientists-educators-practitioners for careers in pharmaceutical education, research, industry, and related areas of specialized practice. Pharmaceutical sciences graduate students may specialize in various aspects of pharmaceutical research; individual programs of study and research projects within each of these areas are quite diverse because of interdisciplinary activities of the department.

21.5 ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS Individuals interested in graduate study in pharmaceutical sciences are encouraged to contact the College of Pharmacy as early as possible for assistance and advice in undergraduate preparation, academic and career planning, the admissions process, and related areas. Prospective students are encouraged to visit the college in person to explore the graduate program.

Admission into the graduate degree program in pharmaceutical sciences is contingent upon meeting the requirements of both the Graduate College and the department as well as availability of sufficient resources for the student's program of study. Admission requires the approval of the College of Pharmacy Graduate Affairs Committee and the Dean of the College of Pharmacy.

Applicants for the graduate degree program in pharmaceutical sciences must submit a completed OUHSC application with all required supporting documents.

 

Current Courses:† Search PHSC prefix courses found online at http://apps.ouhsc.edu/StudentInfo/Courses.aspx?College=GRAD

College of Medicine

Physiology
940 Stanton L. Young Blvd.
Oklahoma City, OK ††73190
†(405) 271-2226
http://oumedicine.com/physiology

Jian-Xing Ma, Ph.D., Chair
Siribhinya Benyajati, Ph.D., Graduate Liaison

22.1 FACULTY ROSTER
For a complete listing of the departmental graduate faculty visit this web site
http://graduate.ouhsc.edu/newfacappt/
(Physiology)

22.2 DEGREES OFFERED
Master of Science
Doctor of Philosophy

22.3 AREAS OF SPECIALIZATION
Angiogenesis and Inflammation in Diabetic Retinopathy; Retinal Degeneration/Inflammation/Vitamin A Metabolism; Insulin Receptor/Phosphoinositide Signing in Retinal Diseases; Obesity-Associated Metabolic Disorders; Systemes Neurobiology of Aging and Diabetes; Cardiovascular Physiology and Neurophysiology; Gastrointestinal Disorders; Tumor Biology of Invastion, Progression, and Metastasis.

22.4 PROGRAM OBJECTIVES
The Physiology graduate program provides comprehensive training in integrative sciences incorporating the tools and techniques of physiology with other disciplines to conduct research at the molecular, cellular, organ, and whole animal levels. The Ph.D. program prepares students for academic careers involving research and teaching, as well as other careers where physiological training is required.

22.5 ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS
The department supports both the M.S. and the Ph.D. Programs. For the Ph.D. program, the department of Physiology is a participant in the interdisciplinary Graduate Program in Biomedical Sciences (GPiBS), which combines the expertise of the seven programs at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center: Biochemistry & Molecular Biology, Cell Biology, Microbiology & Immunology, Neuroscience, Pathology, Pharmaceutical Sciences, and Physiology. Students wishing to enter the Physiology Ph.D. program apply to GPiBS as described in the GPiBS section of the Bulletin. An application is filed with the Office of Admissions and is accompanied by official transcripts and results of the Graduate Record Examination (GRE), and TOEFL for foreign applicants. Three letters of recommendation, from individuals who can address the candidateís research potential and suitability for graduate school, are also required.  Applicants can also be admitted directly into the Physiology Ph.D. program.

M.S. candidates must have previous course work in physics and organic chemistry as well as two semesters of biological sciences. The minimum Graduate Record Exam (GRE) Ė verbal and quantitative, combined is typically 1100 and 4.5 for analytical writing for both M.S. and Ph.D. candidates. Application materials, including all transcripts, GRE scores, three academic letters of recommendation, and a statement of career goals should be sent to the Office of Admissions and Records.

22.6 MASTER OF SCIENCE DEGREE REQUIREMENTS
The M.S. degree is offered with a thesis (30 credit hours) or non-thesis (32 credit hours) option. For the thesis option four hours of PHYO 5980 are required. For either option, no more than one hour of PHYO 5971 can be taken for credit.

22.7 DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY DEGREE REQUIREMENTS
The minimum credit requirement for the Ph.D. degree is 90 semester hours, of which at least 45 hours (and usually not more than 60 hours) must be taken in formal course work. The remaining hours constitute credit for research leading to the writing of an acceptable dissertation. Requirements for the degree can usually be met in four years of intensive study. During the first year, the student, who is a member of the interdisciplinary Graduate Program in Biomedical Sciences and will complete interdisciplinary course work emphasizing molecular aspects of cell and organismal biology, along with four research rotations that can span multiple programs at OUHSC. For the subsequent years, the student enters the Physiology Ph.D. program, takes advanced physiology classes, and perform dissertation research in close collaboration with the major professor and doctorate committee.

22.8 CAREER OPPORTUNITIES
Individuals who graduate with a Ph.D. in Physiology have a number of exciting and rewarding career opportunities in academic research, teaching, biotechnology, government laboratories, industry, and health-related organizations.
  Current Courses: 

Current Courses:† Search PHYO prefix courses found online at http://apps.ouhsc.edu/StudentInfo/Courses.aspx?College=GRAD


College of Medicine

Radiological Sciences
800 NE 13th St.
Oklahoma City, OK 73190
(405) 271-5125

http://www.oumedicine.com/department-of-radiological-sciences


Jagadeesh Sonnad , Ph.D. Director of Medical Physics Education Program
Susan Gaston (Administrator)

23.1 FACULTY ROSTER
For a complete listing of the departmental graduate faculty visit this web site
http://graduate.ouhsc.edu/newfacappt/

23.2 DEGREES OFFERED
Master of Science
Doctor of Philosophy

23.3 AREAS OF SPECIALIZATION
Medical Physics, subspecializing in the Physics of Radiation Therapy, Diagnostic Radiology, Nuclear Medicine, Ultrasound, Computed Tomography and Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

23.4 PROGRAM OBJECTIVES
Medical physics is an applied branch of physics that deals with medical imaging and applications in the treatment of disease and is closely allied with bioengineering and health physics. Medical imaging covers multiple modalities including diagnostic radiology, nuclear medicine, ultrasound, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging while radiation therapy, a major subspecialty in medical physics, is concerned with the treatment of disease.

The medical physics program strives to provide a rigorous well rounded and clinically based training that is current in both diagnostic and radiation therapy physics. The graduate program in the Department of Radiological Sciences offers both M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in medical physics.

Potential students are encouraged to correspond directly with the coordinator to obtain descriptive information on the profession of Medical Physics and the M.S. and Ph.D. programs.


23.5 ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS
In addition to the general requirements listed in the Graduate College bulletin, applicants must present clear evidence of a strong foundation in chemistry and mathematics, as well as in both written and spoken English. Applicants must have also acquired a high degree of proficiency in physics with coursework equivalent to a baccalaureate minor in physics. The required coursework consists of the following courses and semester hours:


1. Calculus (at least 8 semester hours) and Differential Equations (3 semester hours)
2. Calculus-based General College Physics (at least 8 semester hours), Modern Physics
(3 semester hours) and at least two other Upper Level Undergraduate Physics Courses
(3 semester hours each for a total of 6 hours)
3. General College Chemistry (at least 4 semester hours)
4. College Level Anatomy and Physiology (at least 4 semester hours)


A maximum of two courses may be missed from this list prior to application. The missing course(s) must be completed with grade(s) of not less than a B within one calendar year of first enrollment in the graduate program. Credits acquired before or after enrollment to meet these minimum entrance requirements do not count towards degree-granting program.

In addition to the course requirements, applicants are expected to have taken the Graduate Records Exam (GRE). A minimum score of 400 in the verbal portion and a combined score (verbal plus quantitative) exceeding 1100 are required for admission.

Applicants to the doctor of philosophy program must meet additional requirements. They should present evidence of highly successful completion of a masterís degree with a thesis option in medical physics or related fields. Three reference letters are also required.


23.6 MASTER OF SCIENCE DEGREE REQUIREMENTS
Candidates for the Master of Science degree in Radiological Sciences must complete a thesis based on their own research and must complete the following courses: RADI 5024, 5222, 5824, 6864, 6874, and 6884. The required number of semester hours for the M.S. degree is 32 with no more than six hours to be earned in RADI 5980, M.S. Thesis Research. The remainder of program requirement may be completed with graduate level courses from Radiological Sciences or graduate studies in appropriate academic areas which have been approved by the advisor or advisory committee.

Every student in the graduate program of the Department must present a seminar every year. Entering students shall complete prerequisite courses with a grade of B or better within the first 12 months of enrollment or prior to enrollment. Completion of this requirement will not be given graduate credit in the Radiological Sciences Graduate Program.


23.7 DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY DEGREE REQUIREMENTS
Candidates for doctoral degree must complete a minimum of 90 post-baccalaureate semester credit hours. Doctoral students are required to complete the Radiological Sciences core courses (or their equivalents) for the masterís degree described above.

All doctoral students are required to complete 10 additional hours beyond the core courses required for the masters students. They consist of (1) BMSC 5001 (Integrity in Scientific Research) or equivalent, ( 2) RADI 5303, (3) a 3 credit hour graduate course from one of the three area, mathematical physics/advanced statistics/numerical modeling, and (4) a 3 credit hour medical imaging course, currently offered as RADI 6960.

Two tracks of study, namely, diagnostic and radiation therapy, are available for doctoral students. Doctoral students are expected to complete 6 credit hours in their track specialization. For the diagnostic track this consists of RADI 5643 and a 3 credit hour course in MRI/CT/PET or a course recommended by the advisory committee. For the radiation therapy track, this consists of 3 hours selected from Radiobiologic modeling / Monte Carlo modeling/ advisory committee recommended course and another 3 credit hours selected from Proton Therapy / IMRT / IGRT / advisory committee recommended course. Apart from the advisory committee recommended courses, the other courses are currently offered as RADI 6960.

A maximum of 30 semester hours for enrollment in RADI 6980 count towards the total requirement of 90 hours. The remainder of program requirement may be completed with graduate level courses from Radiological Sciences or graduate studies in appropriate academic areas which have been approved by the advisory committee. Every student in the graduate programs of the Department must present a seminar every year.

Doctoral students must pass the departmental General Qualifying Examination before they can be admitted to candidacy. This examination consists of a written and an oral portion and may contain questions on any aspect of the Radiological Sciences. The General Examination consists of six subjects: production and absorption of radiation, radiation detection and measurement, physics in diagnostic radiology (including magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound), physics in nuclear medicine, physics in radiation therapy and radiation biology. Questions on radiation safety will be included. The General Examination should be satisfied within 3 years of enrollment into the program. Once a student becomes a candidate, the student will be expected to complete original research which represents a significant contribution to the field of Medical Radiological Sciences (Research for the Doctoral Dissertation).

For a doctoral student who has failed the General Examination, does not hold the masterís degree in medical physics, but has otherwise met all the departmental and graduate college requirements for the masterís degree, the following option is available: if the student has achieved satisfactory performance in at least four subject categories in the written portion of the general examination and has achieved grades of B or better in the graduate courses of the remaining subjects, he or she may request to be considered for a non-thesis masterís degree in Radiological Sciences.


23.8 CAREER OPPORTUNITIES
Medical Physicists contribute in the subspecialty areas of Diagnostic Radiological Imaging, Radiation Oncology and Nuclear Medicine. Graduation from this program with the M.S. or Ph.D. degree qualifies the individual for an entry level position in Medical Physics working with experienced individuals within medical facilities and with private medical physics groups across the United States. Currently, a significant number of openings exist nationally, with the majority of these being in the radiation oncology medical physics area. Position openings are advertised in a number of professional publications such as those of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) (www.aapm.org). The individualís marketability increases with experience and with professional certification. Professional Certification is offered through the American Board of Radiology (ABR) (www.theabr.org ), the same board providing professional certification of radiologists and radiation oncologists, and is recognized by the prestigious American Board of Medical Specialties††† (www.abms.org ).

Current Courses:† Search RADI prefix courses found online at http://apps.ouhsc.edu/StudentInfo/Courses.aspx?College=GRAD

 

College of Medicine

Graduate Program in Biomedical Sciences (GPiBS)
P.O. Box 26901, BMSB 332
Oklahoma City, OK 73190
Phone: (405) 271-2406

http://www.oumedicine.com/gpibs

Eric W. Howard, Ph.D., Director and Graduate Liaison

23.9 FACULTY ROSTER
For a complete listing of the graduate faculty visit this web site http://www.oumedicine.com/gpibs/general-program-info/faculty

30.0 PROGRAM OBJECTIVES
The Graduate Program in Biomedical Sciences (GPiBS) is an interdisciplinary program offered by the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center. It combines the expertise of six participating departments and programs: Departments of Biochemistry & Molecular Biology, Cell Biology, Oklahoma Center for Neuroscience, Microbiology & Immunology Pathology, Pharmaceutical Sciences, and Physiology.  GPiBS offers an interdisciplinary curriculum designed to provide students with a breadth of knowledge that will prepare them for their subsequent graduate studies. Students will graduate with a Ph.D. degree from one of the participating departments or programs.

30.1 ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS
Students should have a minimum G.P.A. of 3.0 and have completed an undergraduate degree in an area of science that adequately prepares them for the proposed plan of study described below. A GRE score is required. Applicants who have matriculated from foreign institutions will also need to have successfully completed the TOEFL. GRE and TOEFL scores should come from tests taken within the past two years. In addition, three letters of recommendation from individuals who can address the candidate’s research potential and preparedness for graduate school is needed.  Applicants must also submit a Goals/Purpose Statement.

Students are encouraged to apply by February 15th in order to secure a position in next year's class.  However, late applications will be considered.  Our Admissions Committee starts reviewing applications in December and normally have their decisions made for acceptance by March.  Following the submission of an application, the materials will be reviewed and select candidates will be invited for an interview, the cost of which will be paid by the program. Following the interview, a final decision will be made and candidates will be notified.

30.2 DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY DEGREE REQUIREMENTS
During the first year, students will complete interdisciplinary course work emphasizing molecular aspects of cell and organismal biology, along with up to four research rotations that can span multiple programs. During the second GPiBS semester, students will select a specific program or department (Biochemistry & Molecular Biology, Cell Biology, Neuroscience, Microbiology & Immunology, Pathology, Pharmaceutical Sciences, or Physiology) for their dissertation research. After GPiBS, students will focus on their research, take advanced classes relevant to their area of specialization, and participate in other departmental/programmatic activities, including journal clubs, seminars, and electives.

 

Graduate College

Master of Science in Clinical and Translational Science

1000 Stanton L. Young Blvd., Ste. 258

Oklahoma City, OK 73117

(405) 271-2085

http://graduate.ouhsc.edu/CTS/CTS_Top.htm

 

H. Anne Pereira, Ph.D., Program Director/Dean of Graduate College

Julie A. Stoner, Ph.D., Graduate College Liaison

 

30.3 FACULTY ROSTER

For a complete listing of the departmental graduate faculty, visit this website

http://graduate.ouhsc.edu/newfacappt/

 

30.4 DEGREES OFFERED

Master of Science

 

30.5 AREAS OF SPECIALIZATION

Clinical and Translational Sciences

 

30.6 PROGRAM OBJECTIVES

The goal of the MS in CTS program is to prepare health professionals to become competent in the methodological foundations and conduct of clinical and translational research.

 

Participants will develop competencies related to principles of qualitative research methods, quantitative research methods, clinical and translational research process and design, informatics, effective oral and written communication, human research ethics and responsible conduct of research, cultural competency, research management, and professionalism and career development.

 

30.7 ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS

Individuals applying for acceptance may come from a wide variety of educational and work-related backgrounds, but must possess a professional doctoral degree.  Applicants who do not possess a professional doctoral degree may apply only after receiving written permission from Julie Stoner, Ph.D., Graduate College Liaison for the MS in CTS Degree Program.

 

Application for the MS in CTS program is available at:

https://app.applyyourself.com/?id=uok-hs

 

Applicants must submit:

 

(i) official transcripts from all universities attended

(ii) current curriculum vitae or resume

(iii) three letters of reference

(iv) personal statement

(v) summary of a proposed thesis research project

(vi) identification of an OUHSC faculty mentor.

(vii) proposed mentor's 4-page NIH biosketch

30.8 MASTER OF SCIENCE DEGREE REQUIREMENTS

This degree program requires total of 33 credit hours consisting of didactic study and experiential practicum, and a mentored research project including a thesis.   Students are required to take 7 core courses (18 credit hours), 2 elective courses (6 credit hours), and research hours (9 credit hours).